Hoya talk forum: WIhich species need "hydro-culture" or self-watering pots?

 
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Iochroma
Dec 31, 2011 1:33 PM CST
Name: David
San Francisco Bay area
I have seen a couple of posts where experienced people suggested that they did not have any luck with a species until they "put it in hydro" or "semi-hydro". I thought it would be good to gather together all those species names in one spot. So, I'm hoping the collected wise ones here can answer the question: which species need "hydro-culture" or self-watering pots?
AlohaHoya
Dec 31, 2011 9:01 PM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Hmmmm. In my case (from 50% - 100% humidity) using very loose mix, there are some that seem to grow better in MORE hydroton than the 1/6portion I add to my normal mix. H. retusa seems to do better, all of the finlaysonii/callistophylla groups that want moisture but not root soggy. I'll have to check the gh tomorrow and see which other ones...
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagecpawl
Dec 31, 2011 10:42 PM CST
Name: cindy
Delta, BC,Canada
I grow a few in turface and they seem to do well but a couple have done very well.These hoyas are the ones growing way better then when in my coir mix.lambii,vitellina,odorata,paziae and buotii grows like a weed.I am slowly changing over all my hoyas to S/H.
AlohaHoya
Dec 31, 2011 11:53 PM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
I think all would do well in it...I have the feeling the Swedes (bless their green thumbs) grow in a similar medium and grow very well indeed. Big Grin
Leap. The net will appear.
ImageHoyaDoug
Jan 1, 2012 3:23 PM CST
Name: Doug
Lamoille County, VT
H. davidcummingii will only grow for me in semi-hydro. Since I started growing it that way, it no longer dies. It has never been out of bloom or bud for the past six months.
ImageJulieK
Jan 2, 2012 4:07 AM CST
Name: Julie Kennedy
UK
Any that I find difficult to maintain I transfer to SH, and fingers crossed, I haven't killed any of the ones I have transferred. I just started this last year - so it will be interesting to see how they do during this years growing season.
I'm pretty pleased with this - as they were doomed to the compost bin otherwise.
There are only 3: hoya megalantha, hoya sp Ovalau Island and h nicholsoniae
Dee2
Jan 2, 2012 6:38 AM CST
Name: Dee Enslow
Chipley, FL (panhandle)
When you grow s/h what kind of mix do you use and do you use a pot with no holes in the bottom. Sorry but I don't grow any s/h and am just curious how/what you mix and grow with it.

Thanks, dee
ImageHoyaDoug
Jan 2, 2012 11:47 AM CST
Name: Doug
Lamoille County, VT
Dee, I use the Hydroton clay balls, and the holes on my homemade pot are up around 1 1/2 inches high. That means that the resevoir holds 1 1/2" of water and any excess flows out of the holes.
RandyBoatwright
Jan 2, 2012 1:37 PM CST
Doug, would it be possible to take a pic of your pot?
Iochroma
Jan 2, 2012 1:47 PM CST
Name: David
San Francisco Bay area
Interesting to hear which species you feel need this.

For me its the large thin-leaved non-vining species like the campanulata group, pandurata - lobii - lamingtoniae types, paziae - odorata - cembra sorts.

Anybody else?

I'll take a couple of pictures of empty self-watering pots and put them up here later.
[Last edited Jan 2, 2012 1:51 PM CST]
Quote | Post #809678 (10)
RandyBoatwright
Jan 2, 2012 1:57 PM CST
Thanks, Dave.
Dee2
Jan 2, 2012 3:46 PM CST
Name: Dee Enslow
Chipley, FL (panhandle)
Doug do use anything else with the clay balls or just the balls mad water.

Thanks

Dee
Iochroma
Jan 4, 2012 12:30 AM CST
Name: David
San Francisco Bay area
OK, this is really the first time I've uploaded large images to this site, so tell me how the pictures look.

Here are a few styles of self-watering pots I use. First, a silly style with a strap of web for a wick, and a window in the side of the plastic outer pot so one can see how much is left in the reservoir. They are too tall and not available in larger sizes, but I do like them for small plants. I do not know the manufacturer.
Thumb of 2012-01-04/Iochroma/c0763d

Second, a cheap style I like a lot that has a detachable saucer and a hole big enough to test the water level with a finger. This style is great with hydroton balls. Might not be good in areas with mosquito problems. I have heard that these pots, called a "ribbed plant spa" by Misco, have gone out of production, but you can still find them on line.
Thumb of 2012-01-04/Iochroma/d2cc38

And third, the new style from Architectural Supplements (ASI) that has the cool feature of a little red indicator rod that floats up in a clear bubble when there is water down below. It has a big tube that makes adding water easy, but has a lid to exclude dirt and bugs. This system comes with a small bag of hydroton to place at the base with a fill of normal soil on top, but it works well with an all hydroton fill too. They come in a huge range of sizes, but are not cheap. The walls are not super thick, but sturdy enough; most people would put these inside a more decorative outer pot.
Thumb of 2012-01-04/Iochroma/440bba

I would like to see other styles if you have them.

ImageJulieK
Jan 4, 2012 3:25 AM CST
Name: Julie Kennedy
UK
I just use ordinary plastic pots, with all hydroton, and stand the pot in a normal plant saucer. When the saucer is dry, I put more water in...

Self watering pots are really difficult to find in the UK. I got some REALLY cheap ones off ebay. I grow engleriana in that very successfully. They have an enclosed water vessel that secure to the base of the pot - which makes the pot really tall. The water tends to go very green - so I've stopped using them, except for engleriana, which I let run dry anyway! (I forget to water it!)
All other SW pots are too expensive for me. Ikea did some nice ones - but they are all huge unfortunately.
ImageHoyaDoug
Jan 4, 2012 10:59 AM CST
Name: Doug
Lamoille County, VT
Randy, I can't take a photo of my pot, because it is inside a second pot, and I have bamboo hoops between the pots. It would be difficult to separate it to photograph. Here is a link that shows what it looks like. Unfortunately, this guy's business is now defunct.
http://www.firstrays.com/shphotos.htm

All it is is a plastic container with a couple of holes melted into it about an 1 1/2" from the bottom.

Dee, everytime I water, I fertilize as well. I water and all the excess flows out of the holes.
Dee2
Jan 4, 2012 4:22 PM CST
Name: Dee Enslow
Chipley, FL (panhandle)
Gotcha ya Doug. Went to the website and a visual speaks millions. Just kick me every now and then and I will get it.

Dee
RandyBoatwright
Jan 4, 2012 6:11 PM CST
Thanks, Dave and Doug. Your pictures and website referral were very helpful.
I know we've had discussions about hydroton and I think I might try to start adding some to my hoyas that require more moisture. I have to say that during my recent health issues I have seriously neglected a few hoyas and much to my surprise they are flourishing. Fathom that!
AlohaHoya
Jan 4, 2012 7:43 PM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Personally, I think they are killed more with kindness than neglect....
Leap. The net will appear.
ImageJulieK
Jan 5, 2012 1:37 AM CST
Name: Julie Kennedy
UK
AlohaHoya wrote:Personally, I think they are killed more with kindness than neglect....


I agree Any plant of mine that doesn't thrive on neglect is loooong gone Whistling
ImageLauraCarnosa
Jan 5, 2012 1:40 PM CST
Name: Laura Gardiner
Manitoba, Canada
You can't 'un-ring' a bell.
AlohaHoya wrote:Personally, I think they are killed more with kindness than neglect....

I once read, most houseplants (generally speaking) die from being over-watered, opposed to under-watered.
Hard to say if that's the case at my house!

"When you have only two pennies left in the world, buy a loaf of bread with one, and a lily with the other."
- Chinese Proverb

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