Discussion of Colors, Forms or Varieties forum: White

 
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Imageedewitt
Feb 23, 2012 11:50 AM CST
Name: Eric DeWitt
Mountainair, NM
teddahlia wrote:Thumb of 2012-02-23/teddahlia/bb8a93
R. Kris A ID W
Another nice one in white. It is said to be related to Edna C. In my garden this one grows very vigorously.


I like it! Ralph Helens has some great looking introductions.
[Last edited Feb 23, 2012 7:47 PM CST]
Quote | Post #833444 (1)
ImageMaryNZ
Feb 23, 2012 7:07 PM CST
Name: Mary St George
New Zealand

Very nice :)
My photos are licensed CC BY (Attribution). More Dahlia photos here.
I also spend time in FB Dahlia groups at http://www.facebook.com/groups/363854624030/ and http://www.facebook.com/groups/dahlias/
ImageRedmondPhyllis
Feb 23, 2012 10:09 PM CST
Name: Phyllis Stengl
Sequim, WA
Deer are beautiful if they don't e
R Kris is gorgeous!
Imagehonnat
Oct 17, 2012 8:48 PM CST
St. Paul, MN
Has anyone tried Kenora Challenger ? I've got it on my "maybe" list - but wonder if it would be a good option in heat. Any info would be great. Thanks!
Imageteddahlia
Oct 17, 2012 9:07 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
Kenora Challenger has won best flower in show at numerous shows including ADS national shows. It is not one that is easy to grow. Does not not grow very tall either. I know of a show person who has won numerous best in show awards who was never able to get a really good flower to a show. I grew it a couple of times and it did not do well for me. Kenora Jubilee is easier to grow but still difficult in heat.
We like to place a sign on our porch that says: We are in the garden. Really, we are always in the garden.
ImageMaryNZ
Oct 17, 2012 9:09 PM CST
Name: Mary St George
New Zealand

Hmm, I wonder whether that one has sprouted. I have grown it last summer. Not sure about heat. It was a coolish summer here. I can find records of it winning shows in Australia, in Victoria and New South Wales. Parts of NSW get pretty hot, but parts are coastal and quite temperate.
My photos are licensed CC BY (Attribution). More Dahlia photos here.
I also spend time in FB Dahlia groups at http://www.facebook.com/groups/363854624030/ and http://www.facebook.com/groups/dahlias/
Imagehonnat
Oct 17, 2012 11:27 PM CST
St. Paul, MN
Good info to know. I'm always ok with a dahlia that doesn't grow too tall. I find it easier to be able to arrange the bed with shorter ones in front and taller ones behind. The one thing that makes some of the smaller varieties difficult for me to grow for showing, is that they are way harder to get in and restrict laterals because the leaf pairs are SO close to eachother - it is just a more crowded plant that I feel I need to fuss over to give it some breathing room.

What makes this one "difficult to grow?" Bad form? Open centers? Not many blooms? Green centers? Disease issues? Insects? Bad stock out there?.... Confused
[Last edited Oct 17, 2012 11:28 PM CST]
Quote | Post #919975 (7)
ImageMaryNZ
Oct 18, 2012 1:33 AM CST
Name: Mary St George
New Zealand

I didn't get it up to size or have many blooms, but it went in late, wasn't disbudded, and was in quite a bit of shade. Form and centres were good. Did not seem to be a bug magnet. I know a forum where there is quite a bit of advice about growing it in the UK, but I gather your climate is very different. I gather they only allow four laterals to grow, and disbud these all the way down, to achieve show size.
My photos are licensed CC BY (Attribution). More Dahlia photos here.
I also spend time in FB Dahlia groups at http://www.facebook.com/groups/363854624030/ and http://www.facebook.com/groups/dahlias/
Imagehonnat
Oct 18, 2012 7:06 AM CST
St. Paul, MN
More good info to know. I often hear the phrase "difficult to grow" and wonder what exactly that means. It seems there are a whole lot of things that could make a dahlia more difficult to grow. I'm more tolerant of some of those things (i.e. - need to restrict, short plant, doesn't produce may blooms).

Other things I am less willing/able to deal with (insect magnet, green centers, weak stems...)
Imageteddahlia
Oct 18, 2012 8:39 AM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
It was not very vigorous in our garden. I believe that with intense care and disbranching and disbudding it will produce a superb flower or two just about anywhere. Certainly not a cut flower and not a flower for the casual grower. I talked to the originator Gordon Leroux about it in the only conversation I ever had with him. He said that it did not pass in the trial garden(s). That caused him to never enter another variety in the trial gardens. Instead, he placed his best new varieties with very experienced exhibitors and asked them to show them. Kenora Jubilee was given to a few growers who won several best in show awards that first year. I had a discussion with two very experienced show exhibitors about it compared to Kenora Jubilee. Both had won numerous best in show awards and both said that Challenger was a better flower when grown to it's potential. They both also said that it was much more difficult to grow than Jubilee and that it may not be worth the effort for the slight advantage. I see very few Challengers in the shows recently and many more Jubilees.
We like to place a sign on our porch that says: We are in the garden. Really, we are always in the garden.
ImageMaryNZ
Oct 19, 2012 2:13 PM CST
Name: Mary St George
New Zealand

I found my lost Kenora Challenger - after going through all the pots to no avail, I went back to where I grew it last year. I never lifted it! The shoots have been doing brave battle with the slugs and snails, but it will make it.
My photos are licensed CC BY (Attribution). More Dahlia photos here.
I also spend time in FB Dahlia groups at http://www.facebook.com/groups/363854624030/ and http://www.facebook.com/groups/dahlias/
Imageedewitt
Oct 19, 2012 8:04 PM CST
Name: Eric DeWitt
Mountainair, NM
Sorry to hear that you lost your Kenora Challenger, mine also perished this year and then a sprout popped out of the ground underneath the towering dahlias around it but it didn't last but for a few weeks and that also died. I will say my "Glacier" cutting I took from my rotting tuber at the beginning of the year has turned out to be a super vigorous plant and bloomer. I'm hoping it leaves me with many tubers because the flowers grow very quickly and quite large. It also is one of those plants that buries it's blooms with foliage if you don't pay attention. I'm quite surprised the cutting lasted from the late January/early February until I planted it in late May/early June.
ImageMaryNZ
Oct 19, 2012 11:10 PM CST
Name: Mary St George
New Zealand

Well done with the cutting. It was a lost and found Kenora Challenger, ending with found. You can forget to dig things here. In fact, only raving enthusiasts ever lift Dahlias here, unless they want to move them. I thought I had planned to move that one, but I must have decided it was OK back there in the shade at the time.

I'll move it when I do the big plant out. I was going to plant out this weekend, but we have an even colder spell due this chilly spring! Then evaluate gaps, if there are any, and then make a final decision about whether this is the year to try importing!!! I do have an exporter who has confirmed that she is willing to try sending stock here.
My photos are licensed CC BY (Attribution). More Dahlia photos here.
I also spend time in FB Dahlia groups at http://www.facebook.com/groups/363854624030/ and http://www.facebook.com/groups/dahlias/
Imageteddahlia
Oct 20, 2012 9:06 AM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
I am interested in the differences between dahlias that are overwintered in the ground and those planted from tubers or rooted cuttings. My concerns about leaving them in the ground:
I assume that the tuber clump grows very large and that as the number of tubers increases, the number of sprouts that come up increases. Do you have to limit how many stalks remain? Do you have trouble with weeds that grow very close to the clump? How do you weed the garden between the clumps? My concern is that a tiller is out of the question. Do you have more problems with slugs and snails that lay eggs at the base of the stalks? Do the plants sprout earlier and bloom earlier? How do you stake the plants as the clumps get wider each year(does the stake get farther from the clump)? What are the advantages of leaving them in ground?
We like to place a sign on our porch that says: We are in the garden. Really, we are always in the garden.
ImageIslander
Oct 20, 2012 9:43 AM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
I pretty much leave mine in the ground here until I want to divide them. When I first started growing them I liked big clumps with lots of small flowers so I just left them for about 5 years. Then when the bed got infiltrated with maple roots, and I created a new garden I saw what a mess it made and how hard it was to divide out the tubers...good lesson for me!
NOw I would not leave a plant in the ground for more then 3 years max. The big reason for digging them each year, even if it is in the spring, is to get earlier blooms. I can get them going a month sooner by taking them into my greenhouse and getting them up and going while the ground is still way cold. And now that I am selling my tubers, each tuber is money!

My ducks do a good job on slug patrol where they can reach the plants. I keep them out of the beds when the tubers are first up, but when I set out 18" plants the ducks are fine with them after a week or two.

I am more casual about the tubers in my personal garden. Often they start out as healthy plants I have lost the ID to, or extras of a prolific variety, or ones that are pretty but not good cutters or don't sell well. Sometimes they never make it into bloom, then show up big and healthy the next year, like Normandy WIld WIllie did this year. I will dig this one up and divide it either this fall or next spring, and replant some while potting and growing others of the tuber. IN fact, that is probably my best insurance against loss of a variety is to have it both ways! You can't really predict what winter there will be a real long deep freeze suddenly descend from the Frazer RIver Valley in Canada!

But of course I am talking about having loads of cut flowers, not about growing for showing. Its just that I am not confident about keeping mine over the winter out of the ground. I don't have a "trustworthy" area for tuber storage that can be maintained at the right temperature and abut having a "usually" moderate climate and well draining soil.
Salish Dahlias
ImageMaryNZ
Oct 20, 2012 3:30 PM CST
Name: Mary St George
New Zealand

In the regular home garden around here, nobody limits the number of stalks off a Dahlia clump. The stalks support each other a bit once the clumps get established, but you put three or four stakes around the clump, and put a tie right around all the stakes. They sprout later than the ones I have in pots on the concrete, but when they sprout, they take off like rockets. You don't pinch them out to get laterals, because you have enough leaders. They are no more troublesome to weed than other clumps of perennials. Slug bait early in the season is a very good idea.
My photos are licensed CC BY (Attribution). More Dahlia photos here.
I also spend time in FB Dahlia groups at http://www.facebook.com/groups/363854624030/ and http://www.facebook.com/groups/dahlias/
ImageKimC
Apr 10, 2013 7:24 PM CST
So, who's trying out new white varieties this year? I'm getting: Brookside Snowball, L'Ancresse, White Polventon, and River's Silver Slippers. I still have the "old reliables": Snowbound, Yuukyu, White Fawn, Fleur, and Gitt's Attention.
Imagehonnat
Apr 10, 2013 7:41 PM CST
St. Paul, MN
Pretty short list of white ones for me. Still haven't fallen in love with a white dahlia, and they always seem to attract the bugs. I'll be trying out on the farm -
Karras 150
Porcelain
L'Ancresse
Blizzard
Brookside Snowball
Bride to Be

Also will be trying a Kenora Challenger in the backyard.
ImageKimC
Apr 10, 2013 8:47 PM CST
Duh, forgot to put Blizzard on my "have" list. Not like I don't have about a hundred of them (no really, I do). Makes lots of nice small white flowers with great form and long stems for cutting, not to mention they're tuber making machines. Did I mention they also win at shows too? Smiling
ImageIslander
Apr 11, 2013 10:00 AM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
Really looking forward to trying my Blizzard's Kim! Also have ordered Bride to Be at Ted's recommend, and have Joel Louisa and Cornbride and Snowflake. Cornbride has a bit of a golden/tan "Corn" color to it, and did not produce an abundance of flowers or tubers last year. But will see which whites I keep after this year. Was quite disappointed in my freebie "Carl Chilson" last year...it wasn't that great then died of disease, which may have been its whole story for me. I liked Snowfake but it was not real prolific for me. It was quite a graceful flower.

(A-D-D Moment**** Just realized how spectacular my white rose bed would look with white tipped bright colored dahlias in it!)
Salish Dahlias

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