Chat forum: Totally Off Topic 2020

 
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ImageDahliaGardener
May 23, 2020 7:36 PM CST
Name: Cynthia
BG, KY USDA Zone 6b
Sanity = Dirt under your nails...
Thumb of 2020-05-24/DahliaGardener/5e50cc

We have been playing mad food-scientist at our house since our weather has stayed cooler and we've actually had a spring this year. This means we have been able to use the oven much longer than normal, and we have taken full advantage.

Currently, we are torturing wild yeast in the refrigerator, as a warm and active sourdough culture eats too much, and neither can we afford to feed it, nor can we eat all the 'fruits" of its produce.

So, we've intermittently fed it, then subjected it to hypothermia and starved it, off and on for about two weeks now.

We have eaten sourdough sesame crackers, sourdough pancakes and sourdough flat bread (don't ask, I really can't explain it, but it's the pretty, artistic looking one in the upper left of the picture, and it is all of an inch and a half thick - a real brick!).

Finally, I decided to try sourdough bread bread (as opposed to flat bread, which I still can't explain). This time, the recipe looked to be much more simple, and understandable. The only reason it took more than one day is because it, also, is an advocate of yeast torture and so the dough had to rise all night in the refrigerator.

It baked up pretty. Mr. DG says it tastes like sourdough bread.

I'm pretty happy with it, as I just read that I can't get a nice loaf unless my starter is at least two months old.

To which I say "Pshaw!" Mine's not even a full two weeks old and these most recent two loaves rose nicely, thank you very much!

Did I take a picture, though? No. There is a video but I can't upload it. Story of my life.

By the way, the other little loaf in the picture is what happens when you are trying to make crackers with the starter discard but get interrupted. So much for not being able to get a loaf to rise before two-months old!

What have you all been doing while staying home the past two months?

C DG


All gardening is landscape painting.
- William Kent

Imageblown_dry
May 23, 2020 10:30 PM CST
Name: Amanda
CA Redwood Coast - Zone 9b
DahliaAddict.com
Very nice, Cynthia. I love sourdough.

I converted lawn into a new bed today.

Thumb of 2020-05-24/blown_dry/cdc015
ImageDahliaGardener
May 24, 2020 4:37 AM CST
Name: Cynthia
BG, KY USDA Zone 6b
Sanity = Dirt under your nails...
Yay! More space for flowers to play! Hurray! Hurray! Hurray!

What are you planning to put in there?

C DG
All gardening is landscape painting.
- William Kent

ImageDahliaGardener
May 24, 2020 8:30 AM CST
Name: Cynthia
BG, KY USDA Zone 6b
Sanity = Dirt under your nails...
Thumb of 2020-05-24/DahliaGardener/90a60c

Figured out how to transfer a picture from my messages to my album so I could upload it.

Couldn't take another picture of the loaves as we shared so they're gone.

Here's what the inside looks like; kinda holey:

Thumb of 2020-05-24/DahliaGardener/085cd6

I'm hoping for better insides next time so we can use the slices for sandwiches without having glops of condiment dripping through the holes.

C DG
All gardening is landscape painting.
- William Kent

Imageteddahlia
May 24, 2020 9:56 AM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
It is an interesting history subject on how people made their bread over the millenniums. In ancient Rome the government gave you(not everybody but probably a majority) a ration of grain each month from Egypt . It was against the law to bake your own bread and bakers would grind your grain and bake it for you. They used horses and mules to turn the grinding stones, so a bakery may have been a rather smelly place.
In the middle ages in Great Britain , again you could not bake your own bread as ovens were banned. When you had your bread baked at the bakery the bottom was very hard and if you had the means you ate only the "upper crust".
In ancient Egypt, where they grew the grain for Rome, Cleopatra taxed the farmers on their grain crops destined for Rome and she became one of the richest women in the history of the world. No wonder Julius Caesar and Marc Anthony chased after her.
“Flowers are like friends; They bring color to your world.” – Unknown
ImageIslander
May 24, 2020 10:38 AM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
My Great Grandfather Witcombe was a baker from England. He came over with his wife and 2 little girls at the time of the great Chicago Fire. He built a brick bakery in Pipestone, MInnesota. I wish I could taste the bread he made and sold! This was long before the days of "wonder bread", I missed knowing both him and his daughter who was my grandmother so don't have more then a photo of the bakery with them in front of it. I wish dear great grandfather would have passed on some bread making secrets to me! My loafs yesterday came out weird. Its the first time I didn't use sourdough in a while and the loaves tasted like sawdust.
Salish Dahlias
Imageblown_dry
May 24, 2020 1:58 PM CST
Name: Amanda
CA Redwood Coast - Zone 9b
DahliaAddict.com
Interesting bread facts!

I have a few different cultivars of Salvia Leucantha, Mexican bush sage, that has been waiting patiently for a home. I hope to attract a lot of hummingbirds.

Thumb of 2020-05-24/blown_dry/3601c0
ImageDahliaGardener
May 24, 2020 5:55 PM CST
Name: Cynthia
BG, KY USDA Zone 6b
Sanity = Dirt under your nails...
That will be wonderful, Amanda! Bring on the hummingbirds!
I had some in CA as well. I always loved how the blossoms were fuzzy.
We also had one that was more of a vining type, with darker foliage and fuzzy magenta flowers.
So many wonderful salvias!

Noni, I feel your pain. But I'm confident you'll be back on track with your breadmaking soon!

Ted, my crust is still pretty hard on the bottom. But my grandad taught us what to do with it: you dunk it in some really good hot cocoa and that's what you eat for dinner! Thumbs up

C DG
All gardening is landscape painting.
- William Kent

ImageIslander
May 24, 2020 8:22 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
Just reading about how to make crackers. We can't find either my favorite cookies (Dare Maple sandwich cookies) or the Walla Walla Sweet Onion crackers . Sounds like it would be real easy to make some if we had a bit of dried Walla Walla Sweet onion. I am certainly up for trying seeds and such on my crackers.
Salish Dahlias
ImageDillyDahlia
May 24, 2020 8:29 PM CST
Name: TJ
NY Zone 6a
Flower Power!
I saw our first hummingbird yesterday! What a delight!

My grandfather was from Hungary, and he (with my grandmother) had a bakery here in NYS. I dearly miss them and the amazing fresh breads, rolls, huge black and white cookies, eclairs and many Hungarian goodies. A slice of fresh bread with butter was the best treat ever! I wish that I had asked my grandfather to teach me his recipes. They were amazing.
Imageteddahlia
May 24, 2020 8:35 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
I am a Walla Walla boy and my first job was harvesting the Walla Walla Sweet Onions. The farmer was Rudy Zaro. He was a real farmer that worked from dawn to dusk. My hands and entire body was permeated with the onion smell. He ate the onions for lunch like we would eat an apple. I learned to love them and a hamburger with a half inch thick slice of WW Sweet onion is a dream meal for me. I do not like regular onions and an 1/8 thick slice of them can be too much.
There are Vidalia Sweets, Hawaiian Sweets and Walla Walla Sweets and Mayan Sweets. All can be good but the Walla Walla is best.
“Flowers are like friends; They bring color to your world.” – Unknown
Imageteddahlia
May 24, 2020 8:38 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
Hummingbirds out for several weeks here and a juvenile is especially active, flitting around quickly from flower to flower. The boys have their red mantle.
“Flowers are like friends; They bring color to your world.” – Unknown
SteveM
May 24, 2020 8:52 PM CST
Name: Steve
San Diego
Commercial cut flower grower
When I was growing up my mother would make homemade bread once a week. There is nothing better than hot homemade bread with real butter. Except... maybe the occasional times when she would pull out the deep fryer and make her version of Indian (Native American) fry bread. Maybe my favorite food in the world!
[Last edited May 24, 2020 8:53 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1347306 (13)
Imageblown_dry
May 24, 2020 9:16 PM CST
Name: Amanda
CA Redwood Coast - Zone 9b
DahliaAddict.com
My grandma had a deep fryer too. She would make me homemade french fries sometimes. I can still taste them. Love that fry bread, Steve. My husband's grandma made it too, but in a frying pan. Amazing.
ImageIslander
May 24, 2020 9:42 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
If it weren't getting dark out I would start a new batch of bread right now after reading all that! Lovey dubby . I've used up my first order of Camas Mills Stoneground flour, locally grown and milled in Junction City, Oregon. Time to order some more. Anyone else have a favorite local mill grinding flour nearby? I wish they would publish their recipes on line but they say you have to pick them up at the store. I've been mail ordering my flour during these confined times. I'd love to make a trip there when things open up more.
Salish Dahlias
ImageIslander
May 25, 2020 10:15 AM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
We have 2 workmen here to install the deer fencing around the roses and small orchard...Glory be! Someone actually showed up that had said they would!
Salish Dahlias
ImageIslander
May 26, 2020 1:08 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
Hurray, I found my Sun Gold Cherry tomato plant! I had to go out today and on my way home I noticed a "Plants for Sale" sign around the corner from my place. OF COURSE I stopped and they had tomatoes, peppers, squash, eggplant and pumpkin starts. I had purchased mail order starts from Territorial of a couple of other tomatoes but couldn't find my favorite Sun Gold. Now I am happy. Zach says go back and get a red cherry tomato too. What red cherry tomato do you all like? I think I have grown Sweet 100 before and liked it but not really sure if there is a better one. Nice experience...everything set out neatly in a shady pop up greenhouse with a cash jar on the table and prices listed. All the plants looked bigger and healthier then the grocery store starts I have seen and not been inspired by.
Salish Dahlias
ImageDillyDahlia
May 26, 2020 1:41 PM CST
Name: TJ
NY Zone 6a
Flower Power!
Sweet 100’s are good and Tami G is really good.
ImageIslander
May 26, 2020 1:42 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
I will see if they have those
Salish Dahlias
Imagesylviap
May 26, 2020 1:50 PM CST
Name: Sylvia
West Sacramento, CA Zone 9b
Husky Cherry Red - a little bigger than Sweet 100 - size of a large olive. Very productive. We've already had 1 ripe one so far this year.
[Last edited May 26, 2020 1:52 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1347436 (20)

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