Article: Let's start training! We will start with basic sit, down and stay commands, and progress from there.: Just found your article

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Image Let's start training! We will start with basic sit, down and stay commands, and progress from there.
By Lance Gardner on August 19, 2011

Hopefully, you will read this and other training guides before you get your new buddy, so you are prepared to start working with your friend right away. Either way, let us start working on some basic commands, and make sure you have a good start on maintaining a mutually enjoyable and fun relationship.

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ImageAndi
Sep 17, 2011 1:46 AM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
I will have to try your methods for 'sit" and "stay" with Winston the pug. When he came to me this January, he was a scared, abandoned 4-6 year dog with terrible skin allergies. He is so much better now! He didn't understand the idea that a person talking could mean something. I don't think he was ever trained, not even a name.

He is a slow learner, but very easy to please. My previous dog was a Westie - a quick learner, but stubborn and independent. It is a big change.

I think his problem with "sit" is that he didn't understand what I wanted him to do. He looked at me with his confused face and tilted his head. Your method will probably help. He already responds to "wait" and stands still. Once he understands sit, we will work on stay and down.

"Be quiet" is a bit of a challenge, but we are progressing. (Don't you hate people who yell "SHUDDUP" at their dogs? Maybe that is a NYC area phenomenon.) I read that yelling at a barking dog encourages him to bark more. He thinks you are helping to sound the alarm.

I am not sure if he will ever learn "Don't kill the neighbor's pomeranian". I am working on socializing him. He is progressing well for a dog that had clearly been hit by men and bullied by other dogs, but he is afraid of dogs who bark at him. If they are small, he will try to jump on them, biting and scratching ( He is held on a very short leash around other dogs, so neither dog was hurt). He will remember the dog and be ready to attack even if it doesn't bark the next time. We keep the dogs apart. If walking at the same time, we choose different paths. He likes the male owners if the pomeranians aren't around.

I have to remind the neighbor's kids not to hug Winston. Sometimes he is alright with it, but sometimes he growls and tries to scratch. He is on guard outside (a pomeranian could attack at any minute, you know). He is very affectionate with me, but much more relaxed inside even during thunder storms.
ImageLance
Sep 19, 2011 8:28 AM CST
Name: Lance Gardner
coastal plain Virginia
Question authority, guide in wisdom
I read an interesting way to teach your dog to be quiet on command is to teach them to bark on command first. The idea is that once you get 'control' over the action, you can encourage both barking and not barking. Remember to keep all commands you want your dog to learn very short, one or two syllables is usually best, although your full pomeranian phrase is much more catchy.
As training progresses, you can work on 'distracting' him from aggression through obedience routines - heel, sit, stay, heel past other dogs or aggression opportunities. Hopefully, he should learn to trust your guidance and not show the aggression. Never 'reward' unwanted behavior with 'reassurance' such as petting, holding or similar. Instead, reward with petting for the behaviour you want, such as sitting and not lunging.
Overall, it sounds like you are making progress for such an abused dog. If you get the chance, check out the article by Lynn on her rescue dog Petrie, and you may find it helpful (and very inspiring).
I can't say as I like any type of shouting at dogs, although I have been known to voice my disapproval sometimes as well. Shouting is not training, it is just shouting and adding to overall energy levels, good or bad!
I hope to continue the training articles with several more commands, although it will take a few months to get there.
Let us know how he progresses.
Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground -- the unborn of the future Nation. The Constitution of the Iroquois Nations.
Dogs; Family Fun Unplugged; Perennials, Annuals, Veggies; Happy Birthday Wishes
Imagevalleylynn
Sep 26, 2011 5:07 PM CST
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR zone 8
How fortunate your little Winston is to have you for an owner. He will eventually overcome all the objectionable behavior. Time, patience and correct response on your part will win in the end. : )
You must be on your toes to catch Winston at the very first hint of signs of aggression. Learn to watch his body language.
ImageAndi
Sep 29, 2011 1:29 AM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
Winston is progressing very well. I wouldn't call him aggressive, more defensive. he only barks outside when on the long lead in front of my home. He is never outside alone - we either walk or I attach him to a long lead when I am outside gardening, reading, etc. He is getting better about barking. He gives a couple of warning barks if he sees another dog, a stranger, or a person he doesn't know/like. That is natural.

He only does what I call "crazy barking" at his "frenemies" - mainly two male pomeranians, a yorkie and a shitzu. When the owners and I first introduced the dogs (both on short leashes) their dogs barked, Winston took that as a hostile act and lunged and barked at the same time. I pulled him back before they made contact, but he hasn't forgotten. If both dogs were off leads, their dog would have barked, Winston would have taken a flying leap, biting and scratching, landing on top of the pampered little yapper - a potentially awkward situation with the neighbors to say the least! He only does this in front of our home - technically his territory. If we are walking elsewhere and a dog barks at him, he keeps his eyes open and starts walking faster in the other direction. I tell him good boy as we keep walking. He doesn't bark when we are walking unless we meet another person walking their dog and that dog makes a hostile action - ie barks or pounces. I keep Winston on a tight lead and warn other people that he is unpredictable with other dogs. He used to tremble whenever a large dog was near. I made an effort, with my friends's help, to socialize him with some larger gentle dogs - at a safe distance, on a lead, and to walk him safely past fenced in hostile dogs. He is calmer and more secure around large dogs now. He is still very cautious, but not trembling and terrified. ( There are some calm dogs he gets along with. The sniff noses and behinds and keep going about their business. He doesn't seem to crave canine company).

I tell the children that he doesn't like to be hugged. My late Westie, Tiffany, was popular. She liked the kids to rub her tummy, etc. Winston tolerates the kids, as long as they don't grab him. I am glad that he isn't sensitive to people touching his "cute little tail" although I tell the kids that dogs don't like their tail bothered. In my opinion, as a person without children, is that people need to train their children better! They like to walk Winston with me - taking turns holding the leash. I still get to do all of the cleanup, no problem. We walked to the playground the other day. (There is a dog run nearby). Winston jumped up on the play platform then walked down the slide. We all got a good laugh. Pugs are such comedians when they are in good moods. My camera hasn't been working, I'll have to get pictures. I have a feeling that we will be walking there again.

We are still working on sit. He understands wait. If I say Winston, Wait! He stands still until I say "Winston, Let's go." (However, if I said "Winston, wait" and a pomeranian walked by....I know he wouldn't wait...We need to work on that a lot! That is one reason we have leashes and leash laws.) I am still patiently working and waiting for the "Eureka" moment on sit. It will come. I read that pugs can be slow learners and he is starting later in life, but he is such a loving dog and so eager to please, once he understands what he is expected to do.
ImageLance
Sep 29, 2011 9:41 AM CST
Name: Lance Gardner
coastal plain Virginia
Question authority, guide in wisdom
Sounds like you are getting it well under control, good job. Playgrounds are wonderful play areas and agility courses for dogs, as well (as long as they don't leave presents for others!). Agility can also be a wonderful confidence booster.
One reason I have larger dogs is so my son can play with them a bit rougher and little concerns about hurting them. I still make sure his play is reasonable, but it takes a lot to bother my two. They play much rougher than he ever can, but tight hugs about the neck have been discouraged. I have also told him to always ask first before petting another dog, hold his hand out for a sniff and check the reaction, then go from there. I have trained him well, at least with dogs!
I have always said training children and dogs is very similar, as they both respect authority and need guidance on appropriate behavior. The biggest difference is that a child can be taught to understand why (the car can seriously hurt me), whereas a dog more follows the lead but not necessarily because he understands about imminent danger, human social norms and the like.
Looking forward to photos.
Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground -- the unborn of the future Nation. The Constitution of the Iroquois Nations.
Dogs; Family Fun Unplugged; Perennials, Annuals, Veggies; Happy Birthday Wishes
ImageAndi
Jan 10, 2012 1:36 PM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
Winston is still perplexed by "sit". He understands down, so I an working to reinforce that. He usually sits when commanded to stay down - unless the floor is cold or the ground is wet. Centuries of breeding as a lap dog has left its mark on Winston. He is a lap dog with the heart of an explorer, if you can imagine that!

I wish that the neighbors would train their kids, but that is another problem altogether....
ImageLance
Jan 11, 2012 7:57 AM CST
Name: Lance Gardner
coastal plain Virginia
Question authority, guide in wisdom
I often wish for better trained children as well, but have to satisfy myself that my own is doing well (at least so I am told!). All that dog training was wonderful practice for raising one with 2 legs.
It sounds like the training has progressed well overall and maybe sitting is just something he does not quite get. I am not sure what to do except to continue to try and put him in the proper posture with the front up and the back down. Maybe if you put a hand on his chest to hold that end up it will help him to understand that only the back end is supposed to bump the ground. Does he ever sit on his own? Saying 'sit' while in that posture will also help him to understand what is requested.
One of my dogs does not like to get her tail wet so will almost sit with her tail off the ground when it is wet outside. The other one does not care at all and will plop down in a mud puddle.
Thanks for the update and keep us posted.
Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground -- the unborn of the future Nation. The Constitution of the Iroquois Nations.
Dogs; Family Fun Unplugged; Perennials, Annuals, Veggies; Happy Birthday Wishes
ImageAndi
Jan 18, 2012 7:00 PM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
I am trying to say "good boy sit" when he sits. He is learning "down" and "wait" so I am keeping with those.

He is doing so much better both physically and behaviorally since I adopted him a year ago. He is a wonderful dog and excellent company.

The major problem is he would like to attack the neighbor's Pomeranian, but the "feeling" seems to be mutual. They just love to hate each other. Luckily, we both keep our little dogs on leashes, so no one has gotten hurt. He doesn't seek out canine company in general. I suspect that he had been bullied in the past. He used to tremble when he saw a big dog. I have worked on socializing him with other friendly bigger dogs. He is cautious but not terrified with large dogs now.

ImageLance
Jan 20, 2012 7:20 AM CST
Name: Lance Gardner
coastal plain Virginia
Question authority, guide in wisdom
Sounds like you are doing a good job, keep up the good work.
Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground -- the unborn of the future Nation. The Constitution of the Iroquois Nations.
Dogs; Family Fun Unplugged; Perennials, Annuals, Veggies; Happy Birthday Wishes

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