Identification forum: Pest Preventions

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Views: 31, Replies: 15 » Jump to the end
Susan727
Aug 14, 2012 9:06 AM CST
Please post your very own methods for pest preventions. I'm getting prepared to when I bring my plants inside around the end of September.

There was one post, that I can't find now, of a very simple method and I can't find it right now.

Appreciate your very best methods and products.

Thanks,
Susan
ImageCeeDub
Aug 15, 2012 9:03 AM CST
Name: Christine Wootton
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
I treat all my plants, inside and outside with BATS about two weeks before I bring the outside plants in for the winter. I don't know how simple this may be for you, but I will try my best to make it simple this year - I don't know how yet.
Christine
Susan727
Aug 15, 2012 10:01 AM CST
Does this just go into the soil and flushed with water? If so, that sounds the simplest. So far I have not seen anything but I know they're coming. LOL!! Thanks.

Susan
AlohaHoya
Aug 15, 2012 10:17 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Yes...I think BATS treatment is the best. I prefer the liquid - add it to their water and let them drain really well and sit in that water for 10or so mins.....
Leap. The net will appear.
ImageLali_Go_Lightly
Aug 15, 2012 11:02 AM CST
Name: Lali (Begoniacrazii)
NorCal
No judgement here, and I type this with nothing but the kindest tone, but as a beekeeper, I urge you to do your research on BATS and its effect on pollinators. imidacloprid is toxic to honeybees as well as other native bees and vital pollinators.

I'm not saying don't use it (I threw mine away), but if you put your plants are outside, please take a look at the potential ramifications of the insecticide.

Another thing to consider is the resistance to imidacloprid that insects such as mites develop, rendering it less effective and breeding 'uber' mites.

Most European countries have banned it as the peer reviewed research shows it's toxicity. Thanks for considering this.
Stepping off of my soap box.
Perception is Unique!
Imagethreegardeners
Aug 15, 2012 11:13 AM CST
Name: Lee Anne Stark
Ontario, Canada
Perpetually happy!
....and, that's why BATS isn't approved for use here in Canada.

If I have to, I use Neem...and only indoors after I bring things in...but I've never had a pest problem after bringing them indoors in the Fall....unless you count the odd spider...
AlohaHoya
Aug 15, 2012 11:32 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Lali...I support you 100% and really should have mentioned this in my post. I use it ONLY in my greenhouse (no bees in there). And now I have switched to a granular form of it that I use only in my greenhouse and only on plants that are showing problems!!!

Another, more gentle, treatment is to dunk the whole plant (yes....pot and all) into a detergent/oil solution. The fine oil/soap suffocate the beasties...and it's quick...just in and out!!!

STOCK solution: 1 T dishwashing soap (NOT degreasers like Dawn) + 1C vegetable oil. Mix 1T of this to 1C of water and spray plant OR use 2T in a Gal of water and quickly dunk the plant. The dunking method is the only way I have been able to kill all of the mealies on a H. compacta!!!

Leap. The net will appear.
ImageLali_Go_Lightly
Aug 15, 2012 12:11 PM CST
Name: Lali (Begoniacrazii)
NorCal
Agreed on the soap mix.And actually I find the soap/oil spray to be pretty effective.

I didn't really consider not using BATS until I became a 'beek' and found out what it does. And again, no judgment to others if you use it or similar insecticides as everyone has different growing environments and some have hoyas as their business and need to protect their livelihood. It's just something to be aware of when used.

Another neem derivative that I use is called Azamax, that's the brand name but any product containing azadirachtin will work. It is essentially a 100% neem product without the oil effect. Some plants, such as begonias or gesneriads suffocate or have intense leaf damage with the neem oil, so I switched to Azamax. It works very effectively for spot treatments of aphids and mealies.

I use a tad of it with a bit of dish soap as both a surfactant and suffocater and I've had good success with it.

My only problem with mites these days are on my brugs. Pretty hard to dunk those so I just gave up and relegated them to the back of the yard. Too much work to spray them and their upkeep in our winter temps became too much. Each year as the got larger and larger, I couldn't haul them into the greenhouse so they wouldn't freeze. I decided that though I love them, I love hoya MORE and they are easier to move in and out of the house/greenhouse.
Truly - for my hoya, I only get the occasional, rare mealie and on my polyneura which I put outside each spring, it gets those little yellow aphids this time of year. One or two good soap sprays gets rid of them, but they do come back and I just spray and rinse again. Not too much trouble.
Perception is Unique!
AlohaHoya
Aug 15, 2012 12:17 PM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Lali...I used to fight mites on my brugs until I just let them go....finally they all zeroed in on one brug and I let them feast!!!
Leap. The net will appear.
ImageCeeDub
Aug 16, 2012 10:59 AM CST
Name: Christine Wootton
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Hmmmm, perhaps then I'll use the neem, but using your dunking method Carol.

All of the hoyas in one room (perhaps 70 plants) have mealies, and I've just been putting off the treatment, as its a very big job and I don't have the huge reserves of energy it would require. So, I've come up with a plan and hopefully I can follow it through.

They've actually taken over the shelving the plants are on - I find them everywhere, so the job is formidable.

In down moods, I've considered taking them all outside and leaving them there to freeze to death in the winter. But I've prevented myself from murdering them, as I know I would regret it, and make many, many enemies here ... LOL.

Back to work.


Christine
Imagethreegardeners
Aug 16, 2012 11:19 AM CST
Name: Lee Anne Stark
Ontario, Canada
Perpetually happy!
Big Grin Christine...if you ever get to the point of murdering them let me know...I can drive down there and rescue them and keep them safe until you change your mind Whistling Angel
AlohaHoya
Aug 16, 2012 11:24 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Christine, I used to grow lots of houseplants in Seattle and got a horrible infestation. I put 2 old shower curtains on the floor, brought in the buckets (2) and a tray for them to drip on and went shelf by shelf. I forget what spray I used on the shelves...but it killed everything. Maybe it was alcohol? Got my young son to help me as he loved playing in water!!!!!

It was kinda fun!!!

I wonder if you took all the plants out of the room and lit off a couple of bug bombs in the room??????
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagethreegardeners
Aug 16, 2012 11:28 AM CST
Name: Lee Anne Stark
Ontario, Canada
Perpetually happy!
Rubbing alcohol kills mealies very thoroughly! It's quite satisfactory to watch the little buggers dissolve right before your eyes. Big Grin
AlohaHoya
Aug 16, 2012 11:28 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
I agree Hurray!
Leap. The net will appear.
ImageCeeDub
Aug 16, 2012 3:27 PM CST
Name: Christine Wootton
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Hmmmmm, bug bombs ... ideal if I didn't have cats, and the room had doors...sigh.

Lee Anne, I'll surely let you know if it comes to that!

I think I need to get a gallon or so of rubbing alcohol to put into larger spray bottles than I have now. Maybe I'll use that for dunking (just joking!). I do like dunking because I can wash the little boogers off at the same time - I've used it many times just with detergent, didn't know that it really needs oil to work properly. Likely why it didn't work. My kitchen sink is big enough to do the dunking; but I do like your idea Carol of putting down old shower curtains (I'd thought of using a tarp, but they always get holes in them).

Back to BATS though; what I've been doing, is when the plant has sat sufficiently for the BATS to work, I drain off the excess into a large glass container (usually an old vase) - I have actually been using that run-off to treat the plants outside. I confess that I have at times used it on my clematises, and I will NEVER do that again, I promise. Spraying with soap and water should be enough to keep the bugs off of them.

Anyway, I'm here at work killing time because I missed my train and the next one is 33 minutes later. So I think I'll mosey on down to the station now and wait for the train so that I can get a good seat.

Bye for now.


Christine
Dee2
Aug 19, 2012 7:53 AM CST
Name: Dee Enslow
Chipley, FL (panhandle)
Christine, I use alcohol the 91percent one and it is very effective inside, I also use it outside when I see the mealies. Very satisfying watching them die

Dee

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