Groupings, Personal Space, Garden Art, and Color forum: Down on the Farm, 2017

 
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ImageMaryE
Jul 2, 2017 9:08 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
Last evening I saw something I still find hard to believe.... a fox chasing a coyote! I think the fox must have had the element of surprise in it's favor. The coyote was running very fast and about 1/4 mile ahead of the fox. Apparently the fox decided the coyote was far enough from it's den and youngsters and stopped. At that point the coyote stopped running. The fox sat down on the hillside where the coyote could see him, and after a couple of minutes it turned and went back the way it came. Had the two of them physically tangled, the coyote would have easily won.

Peas need to be picked today, a job I intended to be doing yesterday just about the time our neighbors came to pick up their mail we'd been collecting for them while they were gone for 3 days. And of course we all had to visit. I sent them home with about 15 pounds of rhubarb. Her plant is not doing well, so she is going to get a start of mine this fall. Both of my old plants have multiplied so many times that they are getting stunted. The fat stalks have become thin ones despite having a whole wheelbarrow full of compost dumped on them last fall. It will take some serious digging and probably some chopping to get that job done and I will have to be brutal with making divisions. I think that no matter what I do, it would be an improvement!
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
ImageArleneB
Jul 2, 2017 11:03 AM CST
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA
Holy cow, a brave fox indeed. That coyote didn't realize what happened.

I have been longing for peas, and lettuce again. Maybe this fall. I think I may make another rhubarb pie, your talking about it makes my mouth water for it. I don't envy you having to dig and divide it. I know it has massive roots but nice of you to share with the neighbor.
ImageMaryE
Jul 2, 2017 12:38 PM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
I'm sure it just reacted without looking to see what was after it, and might have been embarrassed *Blush* while they sat and contemplated each other for a couple of minutes while they panted from the exertion. They might have both been laughing.... surely the fox was!

Today I found one of the adult owls roosting in a cottonwood tree. They are really hard to find.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
Imagebillyporter
Jul 3, 2017 6:15 AM CST
Name: Sally
Nichols, iowa
Mary,
That would be an amazing sight!
ROTFL over embarrassment!

I picked and pulled my pea plants yesterday.
A small town has no secrets except itself
ImageMaryE
Jul 6, 2017 11:37 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
Yesterday was hot, 102. It's hard to get much done but working early when it's cooler is my strategy. Today will be about the same so this morning I ran the weed eater between the grapes and strawberries, mowed down a messy corner with BIG weeds including Scotch thistles which can grow into huge plants, then went between the strawberries and the Boysenberries where the weeds have gone crazy because of the fine spray from the soaker hoses. Yesterday when I was watering the Boysenberries with the hose and hand sprinkler, I thought I have to do this soon, really soon! The job is not pretty but it does give the weeds a hard time! After a day of baking in the sun they won't look much like their former selves. I wish I had put down drip lines. When these strawberries get replaced or the runners planted in a different row I will do that. Drip lines watered most of the rest of the garden while I ran the weed eater, moved sprinklers in the yard and cooked breakfast.

Patch has been mowing the grass along the lane between our house and the road. I close the pipe gate at the top and have a rope at the bottom. He gets to eat for about an hour and a half, then is lead back to his pasture where there is a treat waiting in his feed pan. He has eaten all the good grass and weeds there and my had supply is very low, so this feeds him. He's too busy eating to plot an escape. This morning his treat was a mushy pear I salvaged from the co-op write-offs. Last week he got carrots, apples and green grapes. We thought the grapes were too sour for us. Patch loved them.

I'll soon have fresh zucchini to eat! There is nothing like fresh food. I might get one more picking off the peas. This hot weather will surely finish them off. Later this month I will be starting to dig the garlic and onions. Today I noticed that I failed to cut the scapes off the Turkish Giant garlic. I need to get that done today so that the bulbs will grow larger. I'll work in short sessions because it's already hot.

Our fire danger has reached the high level as of about a week ago. It won't take long for it to get into the extreme range. There have already been some lightning fires and probably some human caused ones. So far they have been relatively small compared to what we had last summer.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
Imagebillyporter
Jul 9, 2017 5:16 AM CST
Name: Sally
Nichols, iowa
Mary,
The drip lines seem like a lot of work, but in the end save you time.
Patch is lucky to have so many good treats.
Smiling, for all the good eats you get from the coop you are still thrilled to get from your garden.
A small town has no secrets except itself
ImageMaryE
Jul 20, 2017 7:02 PM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
I like the drip lines. Once set up it is just a matter of turning on the water, checking to make sure excess pressure hasn't made something come apart, and leaving it on for a couple of hours. The water goes exactly where it is wanted. I'm watering every two days now since the vegies are growing fast and the onions have started making nice fat bulbs.... full of water! The water to the garlic has been turned off... actually just blocked by folding the drip tape and stuffing it into a special end cap. I'll have to take some close-up pictures. The garlic will be ready to start digging and hanging soon and it needs to start drying while still in the ground before the tops die. They've already started.

Tonight I am frying a big zucchini... sliced into rounds about 1/4 inch thick, dunked in beaten egg and then in soda cracker crumbs. This year my regular green zucchini failed to make a showing, and these odd ones with external ribs was all that came up. Actually, they are better for frying because they are not so watery. The corn is up to the middle of my thigh now. So far no sign of tassels in the ones I looked down into. I've still only caught 2 gophers. One winter squash plant is looking quite limp.... that is where I need to put the trap if nothing was caught today where he has been filling the trap with dirt. Sooner or later he will blunder into it. These critters can push a lot of dirt.... like miniature bulldozers! They seem to not have any sense of day and night... working and eating day and night. I have caught some during the night, some during the day.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
ImageMaryE
Jul 22, 2017 9:42 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
This morning I started digging the garlic. If I do a little bit every morning it won't be a long, hard job. Digging is only half of it, now I have to bundle them and hang them in the shed. The wheelbarrow has 2 cardboard boxes full, roots down and mostly dead tops sticking up. When I pushed the wheelbarrow out of the garden and up the hill those tops almost blocked my view. I'll post pictures later.

A long line of Canada geese waddled slowly through the pasture this morning, maybe too full to fly. They were coming from the neighbor's field where he raised triticale for hay that was recently baled. Seeds get dropped and the geese had a feast. Triticale is a cross between wheat and rye. The name came from combining the scientific names.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
[Last edited Jul 22, 2017 9:46 AM CST]
Quote | Post #1255481 (8)
ImageMaryE
Jul 26, 2017 11:33 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
Garlic digging and hanging continues. I'm working on the Chinese Pink, a softneck variety that is weak where the stem meets the bulb. This makes it difficult to get it out of the hard clay soil without breaking the tops off. Tomorrow I will finish that variety. So far I have 35 bundles of 10 hanging in the shed. I'm thinking seriously about not growing this variety next year. Hardnecks are easier to handle. I dig for about an hour, take a break to rest my back, then Rick helps me count and bundle them. I climb the ladder and he hands me the bundles by their strings that have a loop for hanging. All along the 2x4's that support the shed roof are small nails at about 5 inch intervals which I put there to use for this.

I'm still watering the onions. A few have fallen over, most are still making the bulbs larger. The winter squash weren't getting enough water from one drip line so I have added a soaker hose, lifting the vines and putting it under. In a couple of weeks there will be no sign of it.

Yesterday I bought corn at a stand in town. We ate it all last night and now I wish I had bought more for tonight. The yellow summer squash and the ribbed zucchini are producing too fast! Beans have started to bloom, it won't be long!
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
Imageirisarian
Jul 31, 2017 6:38 AM CST
Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA
irises
Our town watering ban mentioned drip lines as well this year. We have to water by watering can when planting a new iris. to many mosquitos to standing outside with a hose after 5pm.
ImageMaryE
Aug 4, 2017 9:42 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
This year I tried two new varieties of bush beans. Cantare had poor germination and is later than Contender which had about 95% germination, good growth and today I was able to pick enough to eat. Contender appears to be a half long variety, with some of the plants not quite remaining as a bush but not really trying to climb anything. Next year I will grow some pole beans on cattle panel arches. I might give Contender another try.... will save some seed since it is an heirloom.

The bi-color corn I bought at the co-op this week was better than that from the vegie stand. Making a note of it here to hopefully remember it. My first planting of corn is about to make tassels.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
ImageArleneB
Aug 4, 2017 6:58 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA
Mary, I have grown Contender because it is an early variety. They're okay but my favorite is Jade, unfortunately, it has poor germination but I still go with it, just plant double.
ImageMaryE
Aug 4, 2017 7:42 PM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
I tried Jade, and had worse than poor germination.... half a dozen plants out of a whole package. I think I'll go back to Blue Lake.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
Imagebillyporter
Aug 5, 2017 2:41 AM CST
Name: Sally
Nichols, iowa
To me Blue Lake has a taste to it I don't care for. At least in store bought canned beans. I like Contender and I think all but one of mine germinated. I remember trying Jade, but wasn't keeping track of likes and dislikes back then. I never thought to keep track of germination. I figure I've planted too deep when things don't come up, as in spinach.
A small town has no secrets except itself
ImageArleneB
Aug 5, 2017 4:49 AM CST
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA
Mary is right, Jade has TERRIBLE germination but the beans are soooo gooood that I tolerate it. I sometimes start them in damp paper towel which is a pain but if we're not going to market, we only need a few plants. I'm not a fan of Blue Lake either. We really love wax beans too and the variety I get is Pencil Pod. They are an heirloom so I can save seeds. Jade is now open pollinated so I am saving seeds this year. I wonder if I'll have any better germination with saved seeds? I'll have to let you know.
ImageMaryE
Aug 5, 2017 6:38 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
Yes, please do that.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
ImageMaryE
Aug 9, 2017 10:30 AM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
This morning I picked beans again and got enough for about 3 meals. Also picked several yellow summer squash, and 2 ripe Legend tomatoes plus a handful of the yellow pears. The drip lines are watering everything that needs to be watered. I had problems regulating the pressure this morning and had to make repairs.

Here is an idea I have wanted to try and have never done it. Stick bean or pea seeds to toilet tissue with some glue, sugar water or beaten egg, then fold the paper over it. After it dries roll it up and label it as to variety and length. When it's time to plant just make a little trench, unroll the seed tape and cover it up. It sounds like a back saver to me!
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php
Imagevic
Aug 9, 2017 12:49 PM CST
Name: Vicki
North Carolina
If you do end up trying that with seeds, please let us know how it works.
NATIONAL GARDENING ASSOCIATION Purslane & Portulaca ~ Garden Art
ImageArleneB
Aug 9, 2017 1:42 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA
Mary, I have made lots of seed tapes. TP and flour paste. I can't remember the proportions off the top of my head. I would lay the TP on a cookie sheet, lay out the seeds, spaced for size and take a squeeze ketchup bottle and drizzle a little flour paste over the seeds. Let it dry and roll it up and put into a zip lock bag. You don't have to fold the paper over, and I have found it is easier to label with variety before you put on the "glue."

Just looked it up and it looks like 2/1, 2T. flour to 1T. water. Adjust as necessary.
ImageMaryE
Aug 9, 2017 3:11 PM CST
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
Thanks. I will just stretch it out on my 8 ft kitchen island. Thanks for the formula.... easier and cheaper than beaten eggs. It's a good winter project.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
More ramblings at http://thegatheringplacehome.myfastforum.org/forum54.php

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