OUR KITCHEN~Food & Recipe Discussion forum: Beef Brisket

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Imageherbie43
Dec 1, 2014 5:57 AM CST
Name: Franklin Troiso
Rutland MA
Zone 6b
I made this on Friday and served it the next day just like the recipe suggested.


Onion-Braised Beef Brisket

By Jennifer Segal, adapted from Nach Waxman's recipe in The New Basics Cookbook by Julee Rosso & Sheila Lukins



Servings: Serves 8-10




Total Time: 4-5 Hours


Ingredients
1 5-6 pound first cut (a.k.a. flat cut) beef brisket, trimmed so a thin layer of fat remains in some spots (do not over-trim!)
1 heaping tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1-1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
8 medium yellow onions, peeled and sliced 1/2-inch thick
3 tablespoons tomato paste
3 cloves garlic
6 carrots, peeled and halved
Handful fresh chopped parsley, for garnish (optional)


Instructions

Set an oven rack in the middle position and preheat the oven to 350°F.
Season the brisket on both sides with salt and pepper. Lightly dust the brisket with the flour, then shake and turn to coat evenly. Heat the oil over medium-high heat in a heavy flameproof roasting pan or ovenproof enameled cast-iron pot just large enough to hold the brisket and carrots snugly. Add the brisket to the pan and sear on both sides until crusty brown areas appear on the surface here and there, 5 to 7 minutes per side.
Transfer the brisket to a platter, then add the onions to the pot and stir constantly with a wooden spoon, scraping up any browned bits stuck to the bottom of the pot. Cook until the onions are softened and golden brown, about 15 minutes. (If browned bits stick to the bottom of the pan and start to burn, add a few tablespoons of water and scrape with a wooden spoon to release them.)
Turn off the heat and place the brisket, fatty side up, and any accumulated juices on top of the onions. Spread the tomato paste evenly over the brisket, then scatter the garlic and carrots around the edges of the pot. Cover the pot very tightly with aluminum foil (preferably heavy duty or two layers) or a lid, then transfer to the oven and cook for 1-1/2 hours.
Transfer the brisket to a cutting board and, using an electric or very sharp knife, slice the meat across the grain into approximately 1/8-inch-thick slices. Return the slices to the pot, overlapping them at an angle so that you can see a bit of the top edge of each slice. The end result should resemble the original unsliced brisket leaning slightly backward. Check the seasonings and correct if necessary. If the sauce appears dry, add 2 to 3 teaspoons of water to the pot. Cover the pot tightly and return to the oven.
Lower the heat to 325°F and cook the brisket until it is fork-tender, 1-3/4 to 2-1/2 hours, or longer if necessary. Check once or twice during cooking to make sure that the liquid is not bubbling away. If it is, add a few more teaspoons of water—but not more. Also, each time you check, spoon some of the liquid on top of the roast so that it drips down between the slices. It is ready to serve with its juices, but, in fact, it's even better the second day. It also freezes well.


Thumb of 2014-12-01/herbie43/d1cf67
Beautiful Souls like Frank leave lasting memories in the hearts of those he touched .
ImageTwinLakesChef
Jan 10, 2015 11:35 AM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
Looks good; I've been doing brisket a couple of different ways. I like it best on my smoker.

Next try will be to marinate in Lawry's Teriyaki Marinade and slow cook it with charcoal; charcoal at one end of the bbq and meat at the other end-indirect.

Like the flat cut.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
Imageherbie43
Jan 12, 2015 6:46 AM CST
Name: Franklin Troiso
Rutland MA
Zone 6b
When I had my charcoal grill I used to slow cook a lot but now that I have the gas grill I hate to use up all the fuel for one meal 😋

Beautiful Souls like Frank leave lasting memories in the hearts of those he touched .
ImageTwinLakesChef
Jan 12, 2015 7:01 AM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
When I had my gas grill, I put charcoal in it when I wanted the smoky flavor.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
Imageherbie43
Jan 12, 2015 7:15 AM CST
Name: Franklin Troiso
Rutland MA
Zone 6b
I do have wood chips but have yet to try it.

did you ever get the chance to make the curry dish??

Beautiful Souls like Frank leave lasting memories in the hearts of those he touched .
ImageTwinLakesChef
Feb 7, 2015 6:45 AM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
I made it last week and just have not got in to tell you. Inside the ziplock of Jamaican curry there was a smaller packet. Was that the Ghost peppers? I did not use them because I wanted to try it without. Evidently the salsa I used was too salty. So it was very good but too salty.
Next time I'll try fresh salsa with no salt. Probably next month.

I've been making Indian food. I did a batch of Samosas and this week-end I'll do a double batch . . . very popular around here.

I have curried lamb and rice ready to go with that this week.

I have a rack of lamb in the freezer to thaw out . . . I am wanting to do that with a peanut sauce.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
Imageherbie43
Feb 7, 2015 7:47 AM CST
Name: Franklin Troiso
Rutland MA
Zone 6b
Lamb is taboo in my household. Deb refuses to even look at it much less cook it. Her mother used to send over to our house a big bowl of lamb stew which I loved. Deb would leave the room when I ate it and I had to clean the dish afterwards.

I try to tell her that today's lamb does not smell or have the taste like it did years ago but she won't listen.

Yes, that extra packet are the ghost peppers.

I'm not much into Indian curry or Indian food.

Off to Florida on Monday.

Beautiful Souls like Frank leave lasting memories in the hearts of those he touched .
ImageTwinLakesChef
Feb 13, 2015 7:47 AM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
I never was given lamb when growing up.

It can be strong tasting but the key is to use herbs, onion, garlic etc.
which tames it down. I only make it once or twice per year.

Years ago we went to Jamaica for a week to an all inclusive resort.
There was a bar near our building that was open 24 hrs a day and they also served food. The lamb chops they made were so good, we had them every day!
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
ImageIO1
Feb 13, 2015 1:10 PM CST
Hi y'all. I love curry. I have a Mango coconut chicken curry that I make, but other than that, I don't do any others. I had some really good curry in Montanna, though. Arlene, you're lucky. It must be easy to find Indian restaurants out west.

Frank, your recipes always look good. I've tried a few of them. We love your hot sauce! Glad y'all are having fun.
ImageTwinLakesChef
Feb 14, 2015 9:10 AM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
Would love to try your recipe Susan.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
Imageherbie43
Feb 15, 2015 7:58 AM CST
Name: Franklin Troiso
Rutland MA
Zone 6b
Arlene - Susan's recipe are simple just add grits and collard greens to anything you make 😋😋
Beautiful Souls like Frank leave lasting memories in the hearts of those he touched .
ImageTwinLakesChef
Mar 11, 2015 5:32 AM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
Rolling on the floor laughing
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
Imageherbie43
Mar 11, 2015 5:43 AM CST
Name: Franklin Troiso
Rutland MA
Zone 6b
I just made a giant pot of kale and collard green soup and threw in a can of retried beans and a can of beans with bacon along with 3 containers of chicken stock.
Beautiful Souls like Frank leave lasting memories in the hearts of those he touched .

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