Article: Looking Beyond the Garden: What Came Before the Big Bang?: The end

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Image Looking Beyond the Garden: What Came Before the Big Bang?
By Larry Rettig on July 7, 2013

This article concludes the series, "Looking Beyond the Garden." As we’ve seen in two of the previous articles, a tiny portion of something exploded into space and grew to an enormous size. It created a universe of matter and energy, from which grew nebulas, stars, and planets, among other things. And eventually it produced abundant life on the planet Earth. The universe is still expanding today, a phenomenon that can be measured scientifically. But what came before this Big Bang?

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ImageSharon
Jul 8, 2013 12:02 AM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
This is the only statement that makes sense to my limited scientific understanding:

In the end, religion and spirituality fill the void left by science.

I've found that most people are compelled to believe in something. They don't always describe it in the same ways, and in fact some can't describe it at all. But it's there, an inner compulsion, that indescribable belief that there is value in having experienced life, and that living isn't all for naught. It doesn't seem to matter that we don't understand it, it just is.

In the great scheme of the incomprehensible, the one thing I know for sure is that life can be very beautiful or it can be a black hole in which we merely exist. What matters is how we relate to others. Understanding how we got here or where we are going is secondary to the value of what we do with the life we are given.

Thanks Larry, for giving us new directions to ponder. Smiling
KAMasud
Jul 8, 2013 3:14 AM CST
Name: Arif Masud
Alpha Centauri.
Energy, Matter. Matter, Energy. Which came first, the chicken or the egg? We all know matter came after energy but where did the energy come from? Higgs boson and what lies beyond?
A person who excels at his field at the end comes up against that brick wall Smiling .
Another remarkable article I tip my hat to you. .
So, ever wondered that THAT particular energy flows through everything, living or not is besides the point.
Wow! That particular energy flows through us all Smiling . Now how to find the exact wavelength and attach ourselves to it?
Conundrum.
Regards,
Arif.
SunnyBorders
Jul 8, 2013 9:23 AM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Great review, Larry.

Also great comments, Sharon, Arif.

Personally, I accept that some things are unknowable, perhaps for ever.
Fine by me.
Why should we think that we should have all the answers?

I'd also wonder how much of mathematically driven Physics can be reduced to everyday meaning.
SunnyBorders
Jul 8, 2013 9:25 AM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Sorry, Larry, Sharon, Arif.

Came up twice.

There is a ready explanation for this event:
human fallibility!
[Last edited Jul 8, 2013 9:27 AM CST]
Quote | Post #987990 (4)
ImageSharon
Jul 8, 2013 9:33 AM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
Maybe it was worth saying twice, Charlie! Smiling
SunnyBorders
Jul 8, 2013 11:54 AM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Thanks, Sharon.

Maybe once for each of the (multiple) universes.
But then I may not agree with me in some of them.
ImageSharon
Jul 8, 2013 12:12 PM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
Oh? I argue with myself at least twice daily, and I think myself and I are currently on the same universe.

Or are we?
ImageZanymuse
Jul 8, 2013 2:50 PM CST
Name: Brenda Essig
Rio Dell, CA
I wonder, if all those great scientific minds were to stop trying to explain our origins, and focused instead on solving our current energy problems, how much better off the human race would be. If they could put all that research into practical applications, they might discover the Higgs Boson is a power source that can be harnessed to supply unlimited, clean power to Earth ... or blow us back into the void of nothingness or into one of those parallel universes.

Larry, your articles are interesting reading. They make my brain do flip-flops and leave me scratching my head to understand the incomprehensible.

Thanks!
Playpen of Graphics FREE graphics, FREE Jigsaw puzzles!
Zany's Playpen
ImageSharon
Jul 8, 2013 2:55 PM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
Amen, Zany.
SunnyBorders
Jul 8, 2013 4:17 PM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Interesting point, Zany.

Think attempting to explain our origins, through the means of Science (Palaeoanthropology), does provide a counterbalance to other types of explanation that are available.

On the other hand, I'd agree that looking for sources of energy, that don't involve military interventions and ongoing conflict, and that are clean, is an admirable thing.
Of course, we read that 90% of Physics Ph.D.s in the U.S. are employed by the military (- intellligence?) - industrial complex, so their attention is diverted elsewhere!
ImageLarryR
Jul 8, 2013 4:43 PM CST
Name: Larry Rettig
South Amana, IA
Thanks, all, for your comments. Some interesting points in the discussion so far.

I'm quite comfortable accepting that some things are unknowable. I'm reminded the title of that old tune, "Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life." A little mystery in life can be a good thing.

Humans tolerate ambiguity to varying degrees. Some attempt to render everything as either black or white. To me, that makes for a very rigid and unsatisfying life. Openness to ambiguity and mystery allows for much richer life experiences.

Focusing science on today's problems is an admirable endeavor and does occur to some degree. To create more of a focus requires an incentive. That usually comes in the form of federal dollars to support research in specific areas. But in the grand scheme of things, scientists are free to pursue their interests, as long as no laws are broken and great harm is not done knowingly.
Cottage-in-the-Meadow Gardens: Come on in and take the tour! Check out the photos!
As a gardener: When planning for a year, I plant corn. When planning for decades, I plant trees. When planning for life, I train and educate people.


Website: https://cottageinthemeadow.plantfans.com/
KAMasud
Jul 8, 2013 7:03 PM CST
Name: Arif Masud
Alpha Centauri.
Maybe the military has hijacked the best minds but then it pays through the nose for the research done. The best minds do not have the ways and means for doing independent research. Then the trickle down effect is also there which does the most good for example this internet which we enjoy today.
That said, I wish they could be leashed though.Dogs of War unleashed are no good.
Regards,
Arif.
ImageLarryR
Jul 8, 2013 8:02 PM CST
Name: Larry Rettig
South Amana, IA
Roger that, Arif. Thumbs up
Cottage-in-the-Meadow Gardens: Come on in and take the tour! Check out the photos!
As a gardener: When planning for a year, I plant corn. When planning for decades, I plant trees. When planning for life, I train and educate people.


Website: https://cottageinthemeadow.plantfans.com/
ImageKyWoods
Jul 9, 2013 7:49 AM CST
Name: Renée
Northern KY
Larry, that was very thought provoking, thanks! Now how about an article on The Big Bloom Theory? Big Grin
ImageLarryR
Jul 9, 2013 8:43 PM CST
Name: Larry Rettig
South Amana, IA
Did you know that there is actually such a theory, Renée? It states that flowers have actually evolved to exploit the unique impact they have on humans. More here: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/big-bloom-theory-6...
Cottage-in-the-Meadow Gardens: Come on in and take the tour! Check out the photos!
As a gardener: When planning for a year, I plant corn. When planning for decades, I plant trees. When planning for life, I train and educate people.


Website: https://cottageinthemeadow.plantfans.com/
ImageSharon
Jul 9, 2013 9:47 PM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
O Larry! I've read that before because I remember the 'we don't give cauliflowers on the first date!'

I had forgotten the title and the topic. Interesting reading, who's using whom, the flowers or the people? Very thought provoking.

Sure glad you said that, Renee! It was worth reading.
ImageKyWoods
Jul 10, 2013 7:35 AM CST
Name: Renée
Northern KY
Wow, and I thought I was joking! I look forward to reading that one--thanks Larry!

Edit: OMG, Larry, you just gave me the subject matter for my next PowerPoint presentation at school!
[Last edited Jul 10, 2013 7:47 AM CST]
Quote | Post #988523 (17)
ImageMaridell
Jul 11, 2013 9:03 AM CST
Name: Maridell
Sioux City IA
enjoy the moment
Good article Larry. It reminded me of the following "riddle" an acquaintance recently post on their Facebook page:

I used to not know. Then I knew but didn't know I knew. Then, I knew I knew. Not knowing was better.

Totally agree that people need their own way of understanding the world around them.
ImageLarryR
Jul 11, 2013 11:37 PM CST
Name: Larry Rettig
South Amana, IA
Might be worth an article, ya think, Sharon? I'll have to see what I can come up with.

Renée: I tip my hat to you.

Good to hear from you, Maridell! Smiling
Cottage-in-the-Meadow Gardens: Come on in and take the tour! Check out the photos!
As a gardener: When planning for a year, I plant corn. When planning for decades, I plant trees. When planning for life, I train and educate people.


Website: https://cottageinthemeadow.plantfans.com/
ImageSharon
Jul 12, 2013 12:25 AM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
I tip my hat to you.

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