Breeds forum: Is there a way to deal with a mean or aggressive rooster.

 
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ImageHaystack
Mar 15, 2010 1:51 AM CST
Name: Howie
Wa.
Invest in those you love and trust
Some time ago there were several ladies who were trying to deal with mean roosters and were also worried about aggressive roosters and their children. Is there a way to deal with this on going problem or do you put them in freezer camp, or rehome them. I guess the answer to this is depending on the individual. But what happens when you have a wonderful rooster that is aggressive and you don't want to rehome, or put them in freezer camp? Trust me there is an effective way to deal with them.

Just yesterday one of my customers called me to tell me his wife and daughter had been attacked by their very large rooster. The bird had cut his wife up pretty good, the daughter got out unharmed but both were really traumatized. I asked if I could come over and talk with his wife and look at the rooster. After probably a couple hours of listening to the story as his wife told it and my asking questions he (husband) agreed to let me have the bird for a few day so I could work with it. After I am finished he and wife agreed I would do a demonstration and the husband,wife, and daughter would watch and then they would make a decision on the fate of the Rooster. This whole situation only served to remind me of some eight months ago I taught a class on taming agressive roosters on Daves Garden, It's really very simple but some just don't have the correct info in this area and often good roosters are done away with because of not being armed with the facts. I wasn't sure if the info would be inportant to anyone here or not and just thought I'd put it out to see if there was any interest. If not and everyone is fine thats great, if any one feels a need for the info I would be glad to share it. Howie.
Haystack
[Last edited Mar 15, 2010 8:52 PM CST]
Quote | Post #123811 (1)
porkpal
Mar 15, 2010 2:01 PM CST
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
I don't even have any roosters, but I would love to learn about rooster rehab.
Porkpal
Imageflgardengurl
Mar 15, 2010 5:17 PM CST
Name: Lenette
Florida
I would love to hear the right way to deal with them. Right now most of mine are very young. I have had a few that bit me or try to jump at me. I don't know if they are playing or starting to feel thier oats (a few just started crowing) and are serious. What I have done was to pick them up and put them on my lap and pet them till they go to sleep. I also have taken them for walks around the yard holding them under my arm so they couldn't flap thier wings or bite. Once I pick them up they don't try to bite anymore. It is just when I go to grab them or put my hand in their 'area' to get the feeder etc. I don't believe in being aggressive to them hitting or anything because it seems to make them meaner. When we were dumb kids we teased one my grandma's roosters so much it became really mean and she put it in the stew pot after it attacked my little sister. So I learned my lesson from that LOL.
ImageHaystack
Mar 15, 2010 9:24 PM CST
Name: Howie
Wa.
Invest in those you love and trust
There are three basic types of roosters:

A. Those who tolerate and sometimes seemingly even invite your presence. If yours is this type. Wonderful, but know under the right conditions everything can suddenly change.

B. Those who have imprinted on you and think your one of his mates, watch for the dropped wind and the dance in your presence. Be careful with this one and maybe even just a stick to tap him may be enough to discourage him from thinking you want to mate with him.

C. Those who feel your are a threat to him or even worse, to his girls. This guy is totally unpredictable and may charge you openly or often times will wait til you turn your back, and then nail you or blindside you. I always advise women especially, wear some reasonably protective gear when retrieving eggs or cleaning the pen's if there is any roosters around. Maybe a banty no problem but some of these boys are fifteen to twenty lbs, and when they hit you you know you've been hit. Use common sense. If you have a mean or aggressive rooster then don't think to clobber him for what he does by instinct. He is only doing what he understands. DOMINANCE. Whe two dominate roosters meet it's generally a battle to see who surrenders. Once one has surrendered it's all over, from that point on its just a casual reminder of whose's in charge. So here is an exercise in dominance that only takes about five minutes maybe four sessions in one week, after that its just a casual reminder. Note the position of the roosters head in this first pic.

Thumbnail by Haystack

Haystack
ImageHaystack
Mar 15, 2010 9:47 PM CST
Name: Howie
Wa.
Invest in those you love and trust
Now notice the position of the roosters head in this picture. This rooster is about sixteen lbs and just beat the dickens out of the owners wife. I have no protective gear here except notice the gloved hand. I had protective gear when I first captured him and then chose to remove it to make my work easier, it was very warm today, and I am experienced. This pic you are looking at is a pic of a rooster than understands dominance. I have dominated him very gently by holding him tightly so he can't flogg me with his wings, I also have is legs and spurs tucked tightly into my side when he can't use them. Now the only thing that remains in his power point is his beak which is very powerful but he can't use it if he can't see me. There fore I have removed his ability to see me.

The way you do this (remove his sight) is one of two ways, place your gloved finger on the end of his beak and gently press down til his head is straight down to the ground. If your afraid of the beak the place two fingers on the back of his neck toward the head and gently press his head down to where he can only see the ground. After his head is in this position continue to hold it for thirty seconds, let go. If he raises his head repeat the process and hold down again for thirty seconds. Continue this process intil you an walk around with holding his own head down for at least one minute and preferebly 90 seconds. If you will repeat this process three times in one week you should get to the point where when you capture him you just go for the neck and bingo he knows the drill and he puts his head down indefinitely. Even for the most aggressive roosters I seldom have to go over three sessions. Then I repeat it once a month until a few months go by and you no longer have a rooster problem. Just now and then a gentile reminder. This is just using what they understand. I see no reason to be mean or enter into a dispute with an animal. To use his own techniques will get you a lot further quicker...Haystack.

Thumbnail by Haystack

Haystack
ImageHaystack
Mar 15, 2010 9:50 PM CST
Name: Howie
Wa.
Invest in those you love and trust
One more pic, I hope this has at least helped some. Hay

Thumbnail by Haystack

Haystack
porkpal
Mar 15, 2010 10:08 PM CST
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Very interesting, thank you!
Porkpal
ImageEufaula
Mar 17, 2010 9:44 AM CST
Name: Lynn
I hope to never have an agressive Rooster but I know it will certainly happen. This method is so simple yet something that apparently works! Thanks so much Haystack! I tip my hat to you.
My path is never blocked, it just needs sweeping!
ImageHaystack
Mar 17, 2010 4:51 PM CST
Name: Howie
Wa.
Invest in those you love and trust
You are more than welcome: I'm with you, I love my roos the are very accepting of me and I hand feed them from time to time. I like that kind of a relationship. It is nice to know however that there is a kind way to work with them. Best regards.
Haystack
lakesidecallas
Mar 18, 2010 2:37 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
Haystack, you need to come over to my house! I have a rooster of type D:

Type D: Hates a certain person and always is after them.

I have a small gray bantam that simply hates me. He tries to attack me with his spurs and I have several holes in both shins to prove it. When I'm inside the chicken pen he will even fly up on top and try to peck my head through the chickenwire. He'll chase me through the woods.

This is the best- we have a small window in our kitchen area and keep it open all the time in warm weather. If he hears me in the kitchen he'll fly up in a tree and walk out on a branch to get as close as he can to the window without falling off. He'll give me the beady eyed stare and crow and crow.

Our chickens are basically pets, so we couldn't kill him (although I've been tempted many times), plus, he is so pretty, we haven't seen any like him. Occasionally he'll go after my husband, but he will follow me around all day to try and get at me. Oddly enough his bantam brother is the sweetest bird, eats from our hands, cuddles, etc. If I yell for the brother he'll come and chase the evil one off, which is nice!

Do you think the head thing would work with him?

Thumbnail by lakesidecallas

Imagecoconut
Mar 19, 2010 7:04 PM CST
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11
Susan, that IS a pretty bird!

Hay, I would sure like a photo of how you're holding that roo, like if the photographer were to be on your other side.

My wild chickens are dying, I have had to bury four chicks and two roos, I don't know what's going on. Gorgeous George is staying on the other side of the house, full time now, so I think he's safe. Durn, I still need a coop! I would like to tame him, he's getting less afraid of me.

And he has a girlfriend, good for him.

Thumbnail by coconut

Melissa

lakesidecallas
Mar 19, 2010 11:03 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
Melissa, how terrible! I hope someone isn't poisoning them.
Mine love bread and will do almost anything for it- maybe that will help tame them quicker.
Curious George is so very beautiful!
Imagecoconut
Mar 20, 2010 4:34 AM CST
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11
Yes, one neighbor said there are too many, and he was going to start shooting them with a BB gun. Guns are illegal here, so he doesn't have a 22. BB's can't kill a chicken can they?

A year ago there were four, now there are about thirty, too many. I want to catch them for my cookpot, but I don't thing I can handle doing the slaughtering.

Hay, did you get the lady to hold that roo? lol.
Melissa

Imageflgardengurl
Mar 20, 2010 6:54 PM CST
Name: Lenette
Florida
Haystack thank you for that great lesson on, The Taming of the Roo :P Great tip on keeping the head down. I didn't think about that one.

lakeside, I love that pic of your roo tromping through your plants like he's saying "haha, look what I'm doing, come and get me I dare ya!" LOL
ImageHaystack
Mar 20, 2010 7:13 PM CST
Name: Howie
Wa.
Invest in those you love and trust
Lakeside, this is the perfect bird to work with, the more aggressive they are, the better it tests the theory I teach. I have never seen a bird including the hens that are aggressive that it doesn't work on. The only thing I stress is if the bird is really mean then those working with it should wear protective gear. I had two very Large Polish crested that attacked me at the same time at a friends house, I had to use my motor cycle helmet and face shield working with them. Two sessions that lasted about twenty minutes each and they never ever created a problem after that. My friend couldn't believe it. I really does work. Don't be shy...
Haystack
lakesidecallas
Mar 20, 2010 8:35 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
I'll have to find some protective gear. I'm afraid he'll still get me, and I'll get so mad I'll bend his head down until it breaks!
Tonight it was dark and he was in the coop, but he heard me come in with the food for tomorrow morning and came out to get me!

Lenette, that is exactly what he was thinking, I believe! He wiped out a lot of Callas that year.
Imagecoconut
Mar 21, 2010 7:55 AM CST
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11
Seems like you could fashion an open ended cage to catch him with, initially, with a sort of funnel at the other end that you could be behind when he comes after you.

And, yes, critters can recognize the things we value. I have crow and cat stories.
Melissa

lakesidecallas
Mar 21, 2010 11:11 AM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
I have a butterfly net that I can scoop him up with, sometimes I use it to move him in and out of the kennel or just steer him or the other birds around with it.

When he's bad he gets a "time out" under a big plant pot- I turn it over on top of him, and then I can work a bit outside without worrying about his attacks.
Imagecoconut
Mar 21, 2010 11:24 AM CST
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11
Hahaha, I bet that makes him madder that ever. That's so funny, poor bird!
Melissa

lakesidecallas
Mar 21, 2010 2:08 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
Poor bird my foot! He's lucky to be alive. Everyone we've talked to around here looks at us like we're completely crazy and tells us to put him in the pot.
What I should do is wear my husbands tall rubber boots and let him flog away at those because his spurs don't go through them. Maybe he'd learn that I'm immune! ha ha.
We do have a lot of fun here. You should have been here the day I was bent over picking up a pot. Mousey was on top of the kennel, and he gave a triumphant crow and jumped down on my back. I think he was yelling, "death from above!"
lol.

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