Dahlia Photos: the sublime to the blurry forum: 2020 Dahlias Blooming

 
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ImageCosey
Jul 26, 2020 12:10 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
Thumb of 2020-07-26/Cosey/207917

My first and only Rock Run Ashley plant is blooming. It takes forever to mature enough for the green center to go away, but once it does, oh my!
Imageteddahlia
Jul 26, 2020 1:09 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
There is a new trend in cut flower sellers. In the past, cut flower growers would never grow a "hard to grow" variety just to get a a particular color or shape. "Not enough time and too many flowers" they might say. Nowadays since Cafe au Lait became so popular for it's wedding flower sales to florists and others, there are lots of hard to grow varieties being grown to get those exotic colors.

Breeding flowers for show people was always different as they would put up with extremely difficult to grow flowers if it could produce winning blooms. I remember listing all the difficulty in growing HH Goldrush to a master exhibitor and he said, who cares as long I can win a big prize at the shows. He did that several times with it and I would not recommend it to any mortal dahlia grower to try and grow it because of the difficulties it presents.

But now the cut flower people will put up with Cafe au Lait and seem to be willing to try other hard to grow flowers. I will remember that when we see a glorious seedling that may have some other drawbacks that could be overcome with extra care.

I need to get HH Calico back and use it for breeding. It's seedlings quite often would fit into the modern color scheme.
Too many flowers, not enough time!
ImageCosey
Jul 26, 2020 2:10 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
It could be a measure that more and more people are personally being exposed to the beauty of dahlias (through a wedding, event, farmers market) and they have caught "dahlia fever" (more contagious than Covid but 0% mortality rate) and the industry has a greater population of enthusiasts that want what no one else has.

As far as flower farmers willing put up with difficult, diva varieties, they are simply following the money. They can't sell bright show blooms with wedding trending mute and blush. So they are searching and willing to pay for it. If current breeders continue to ignore the demand of the general public, someone else will surely come in and meet the need. Believe me, the flower farmers want that easy keeping, profitable blush/soft bloom!

If the dahlia association is smart... they'll quickly embrace cut flower farmers that are a huge part of growing the distribution, exposure, and number of gardeners growing dahlias. Of course the goals are different but we all love the bloom.

And I'll post a pic of the dahlia voted best by bees. ♥️ (different goal/purpose, still loves the flower)





Thumb of 2020-07-26/Cosey/1cd089
ImageIslander
Jul 26, 2020 2:42 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
a new catagory...Beloved by Bees! Does that make it a bbb rather then a bb or B? I seems to have some of those in my seedling patch Big Grin
Salish Dahlias
ImageCosey
Jul 26, 2020 3:58 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
Islander wrote:a new catagory...Beloved by Bees! Does that make it a bbb rather then a bb or B? I seems to have some of those in my seedling patch Big Grin


I like the BBB category! I might continue bro use that. 🐝

ImageCosey
Jul 31, 2020 3:36 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
Thumb of 2020-07-31/Cosey/f4da15
Thumb of 2020-07-31/Cosey/88224d

Two Rawhide seedlings blooming again this year. ♥️
Imageteddahlia
Jul 31, 2020 4:10 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
I am glad to see some seedlings from Rawhide as it is one of the waterlilies that has an interesting set of genes. There used to be several waterlilies that grew especially tall and vigorous and had flat WL type flowers and the stems to the flowers while stiff were not hollow. but wiry. The stems also had what are called spur leaves on them. Ridlings Wicked Witch is an extreme example of the traits as it grows 7 feet tall and the wiry stems have numerous spur leaves. I have not grown Rawhide but does this discussion make sense?
Too many flowers, not enough time!
ImageIslander
Jul 31, 2020 5:54 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
Yes, it does make sense. Collecting Rawhide seeds if on my list of activities for this year. The first plants of Rawhide are just coming into bloom. I like that it has the contrasting color to the back of the petals also. I have them near my Salish October Wedding which seems to have the same traits...the long stems, flat flowers and contrast on the back of the petals. I am hoping they will cross with the Lauren Michelles planted on the other side of them...they also have the contrasting backs and an amazing set of colors coming from their seedlings this year.

When do you all start collecting seeds? I don't want mine to stop blooming but I do want them to make seeds while it is dry weather. It looks like I will be taking time out for eye surgery as soon as can be arranged..I need to make plans. (An implanted lens after cararact surgery years ago has come loose) .
Salish Dahlias
ImageCosey
Jul 31, 2020 7:13 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
teddahlia wrote:I am glad to see some seedlings from Rawhide as it is one of the waterlilies that has an interesting set of genes. There used to be several waterlilies that grew especially tall and vigorous and had flat WL type flowers and the stems to the flowers while stiff were not hollow. but wiry. The stems also had what are called spur leaves on them. Ridlings Wicked Witch is an extreme example of the traits as it grows 7 feet tall and the wiry stems have numerous spur leaves. I have not grown Rawhide but does this discussion make sense?


Makes total sense. Can you post a picture of what you mean by a spur leaf? I think I know what you mean.

For curiosity sake, here is a pic of another Rawhide seedling I didn't keep. It was open more than half the time and had a lot of wonky petals. If I remember correctly, I collected a fair amount of seeds, but had super low germination. Could have been my fault though. Looks like I have 4 more rawhide seedlings this year, if they are still growing. I haven't finished making my paper planting plan to see what has survived.
Thumb of 2020-08-01/Cosey/c2784c
Thumb of 2020-08-01/Cosey/25a6a9
ImageCosey
Jul 31, 2020 7:16 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
Islander wrote:

When do you all start collecting seeds? I don't want mine to stop blooming but I do want them to make seeds while it is dry weather. It looks like I will be taking time out for eye surgery as soon as can be arranged..I need to make plans. (An implanted lens after cararact surgery years ago has come loose) .


I don't know about other farms, but my plants in PA zone 6b don't want to make seed until late Sept. It seems like I collect 90% of my seed just a week before frost each year.

ImageIslander
Jul 31, 2020 8:01 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
Thanks, Cosey. I had few seeds collected last year thanks to a helper who was deadheading them without thinking about it as we picked. flowers. I do want a nice collection of seeds this year. Hopefully I will be all done with the eye surgery by then... We are 8b here I beleive. I know we are 8 anyhow. Typical first frost is around Halloween, or was up on the Island.

It will be fun to compare our Rawhide seedlings.
Salish Dahlias
Imageteddahlia
Jul 31, 2020 8:39 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
Thumb of 2020-08-01/teddahlia/1f14fb
Too many flowers, not enough time!
ImageCosey
Jul 31, 2020 9:31 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
teddahlia wrote:Thumb of 2020-08-01/teddahlia/1f14fb



Gotcha! Thank you!
Imagesylviap
Aug 1, 2020 11:44 AM CST
Name: Sylvia
West Sacramento, CA Zone 9b
What do you call leaves in sets of two that oppose each other?
Imageteddahlia
Aug 1, 2020 12:41 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
What do you call leaves in sets of two that oppose each other?
Normal.
Too many flowers, not enough time!
ImageCosey
Aug 1, 2020 1:05 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
Thumb of 2020-08-01/Cosey/35ea9a

The white bloom is from last year. Blush bloom is from today. This is the same seedling. I did not have that blush bloom anywhere else in the field last year. And I'm pretty good at keeping track of my tubers. Any guesses if it will stay this way or revert back?
ImageIslander
Aug 1, 2020 1:43 PM CST
Name: Noni Morrison
Warren, Oregon
retired flower farmer
I am finding some of my seedlings more colorful this year too...which surprises me as I would have thought they would bleach out in the hotter temps...
Salish Dahlias
Imageteddahlia
Aug 1, 2020 3:05 PM CST
Name: Ted
Oregon
We enjoy breeding new dahlias!
Dr. Virginia Walbot in a discussion on white flowers said that there were seven ways a white flower could appear and these were break downs in the pigment making steps involved to get a red or pink flower. In other words, she says white flowers are red or pink flowers that have a defect in the ability to make red pigment. . So it is apparent that your flower regained it's ability to make some pigment. I would call it a color sport as it is a genetic change that is usually permanent.
Too many flowers, not enough time!
ImageCosey
Aug 1, 2020 8:18 PM CST
Name: LeeAnn
Zone 6b, Pennsylvania
teddahlia wrote:Dr. Virginia Walbot in a discussion on white flowers said that there were seven ways a white flower could appear and these were break downs in the pigment making steps involved to get a red or pink flower. In other words, she says white flowers are red or pink flowers that have a defect in the ability to make red pigment. . So it is apparent that your flower regained it's ability to make some pigment. I would call it a color sport as it is a genetic change that is usually permanent.


I'll look up Dr Walbot. Thanks for the details. I guess I'll have to keep her another year a report back.
SteveM
Aug 1, 2020 9:44 PM CST
Name: Steve
San Diego
Commercial cut flower grower
Cosey wrote:
The white bloom is from last year. Blush bloom is from today. This is the same seedling. I did not have that blush bloom anywhere else in the field last year. And I'm pretty good at keeping track of my tubers. Any guesses if it will stay this way or revert back?


If that is a sport it will most likely take some effort on your part to "save" it. A mutation can occur at any growing point so it is possible to have just one bloom or one stem mutate. Most of the mutations I have seen involve just one stem/branch on a plant and the rest of the plant produces "normal" blooms. If this is the case with your blush bloom, you will need to take a cutting from a side shoot, above the point where it mutated. So, do not dis-bud any of the side shoots on the branch that produced the mutated bloom you will need these to make cuttings. Tag that branch and note if the rest of the plant produces white blooms. If so, take cuttings from the uppermost side shoots on the branch that produced the mutation (you might need to take leaf cuttings). Then, let one of the side shoots from that branch (below where you took the cuttings) bloom normally to verify your cuttings were taken from mutated material. Not sure I did the best job of describing the process. Smiling

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