Cottage Gardening forum: #2 Piggy swap Chat Q & A Thread

 
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Imagetcs1366
Nov 19, 2013 7:46 AM CST
Name: Terese
Leesburg, FL zone9b
Wisconsin Dells Area, zone4
Chat thread... We came from here -- > http://cubits.org/ellasgarden/thread/view/76795

Thumb of 2013-11-19/tcs1366/49e911
Terese -- Leesburg, FL & Lake Delton, Wi
My Email is my userID at hotmail.com

[Last edited Nov 19, 2013 10:24 AM CST]
Quote | Post #1017964 (1)
Imagejoseph
Nov 19, 2013 8:06 AM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
Woo Hoo! Made it over to the new pen.

I tasted some of the new sweet corn that escaped from a breeding program in Iowa. Oh my heck it was nasty!!! The fellow was so proud of it. I was horrified for our culture if that is the future of sweet corn.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited Nov 19, 2013 8:08 AM CST]
Quote | Post #1017971 (2)
ImageDayjillymo
Nov 19, 2013 8:16 AM CST
Name: Jill
NW Missouri
I made the jump. Had to post so the new thread will show up for me. Smiling
ImageJuliesAcre
Nov 19, 2013 8:37 AM CST
Name: Julie Ward
Zone 5 Mo
Returning Piggy
Good Morning!


I agree Joseph, some of the new "sweet" corn is not so deliciouso! Ick!
Imagejoseph
Nov 19, 2013 8:42 AM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

It seems to me like the common thread in most modern plant breeding programs is to make the food as bland as possible: Thus making it non-offensive to the greatest number of people.

I have been saving my own butternut seeds for 5 years now. Each year I only save seeds from the best tasting fruits. This year I also grew commercial butternuts, and butternuts from other growers. Oh my heck I thought that I would gag!!! They were definitely not suitable to my taste buds.

Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
ImageJuliesAcre
Nov 19, 2013 8:49 AM CST
Name: Julie Ward
Zone 5 Mo
Returning Piggy
Yup, Very bland is the trend these days. Your theory---bland being non offensive to most folks could be. I've also heard that the growers are taking out acids so that the veggie/fruit will hold longer...helps the longevity in shipping and sitting on shelves in a store.... grow old stuff and to those that don't grow.....buy fresh from local growers. lol
ImageJB
Nov 19, 2013 8:55 AM CST
Name: Jacquie (JB) Berger
Wrightstown, New Jersey
JBsBirdsandMore.com
This picture is hopefully one of many I can show you since had it not been for many of you, I would have never taken the time to try and start the Easter Cactus seeds. In fact I had never even seen one before, so with all my heart, Thank you. Now, having said that, Please help me keep them alive. Please. They were placed on the bounty on 11/11/2013. Today I tried to get a shot of their tiny little stems just starting to show.
I keep then on the kitchen window (south exposure) and cover them at night. This location guarantees I do not neglect to keep the bounty moist. My file with the instructions in it is close by. Rolling on the floor laughing I have not felt this much pleasure since I hatched my first parrot egg.
Here they are....drum roll please. All my little princes and princesses showing off for the first time. OMG I am really going crazy. You may need to enlarge the picture to see them but I swear they are there.


Thumb of 2013-11-19/JB/4fbf1e

Have a great day! Lovey dubby
ImageJuliesAcre
Nov 19, 2013 9:04 AM CST
Name: Julie Ward
Zone 5 Mo
Returning Piggy
Off to run errands and then to work! You piggy's have a great day wallering!!! Hurray!
ImageJB
Nov 19, 2013 9:06 AM CST
Name: Jacquie (JB) Berger
Wrightstown, New Jersey
JBsBirdsandMore.com
May I ask a question please? I doubt may of us who are really not "piggy" people or "seedy" or whatever you call those of you who are really into growing all these seeds have any idea the amount of time and effort it must take to do what you do. My question is, do you grow from seeds to sell your products or for your own personal use throughout the year? I am amazed at some of the different things you all grow. In fact some I never even heard of before and this is quite a learning experience. What a wonderful group of energetic but patient people. I am completely impressed and had it not been me being fortunate to have Ella as a friend, I would have never had the opportunity to visit this thread. I want to tell you all how much I enjoy your posts and I am really learning something, which makes it even better. I promise not to bother you but I just had to ask about what you do with all the plants you must get at the end of your seasons. Have a great day and keep your piggy noses clean...nothing worse than a dirty piggy nose. In fact I do not think I ever saw A CLEAN PIGGY NOSE. Rolling on the floor laughing
ImageJB
Nov 19, 2013 9:07 AM CST
Name: Jacquie (JB) Berger
Wrightstown, New Jersey
JBsBirdsandMore.com
The time on this thread is still on daylight time. Our daylight time changed a week or so ago.........just curious what time it is?
ImageJonnaSudenius
Nov 19, 2013 9:27 AM CST
Name: Jonna
Belgium, Europe
Hurray! JB

You see, also you can grow from seed. They look very good, but I can't help you further with this tropical plant. No doubt someone else here will help you.

I grow my plants just for my pleasure. I have enough room in my garden and love to grow plants you can't buy at the nurseries. Sometimes I have more plants of a specie than I can put in my garden, or I find a lot of healthy seedlings in my garden. Those plants I sell or exchange 2 times a year on a plant market.
I also exchange and sell my seeds, but that's more because I have so many. It's not a real business. I can pay most of the things I need in the garden with the small income. Yes, it's time consuming, but which hobby isn't Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Imagetcs1366
Nov 19, 2013 9:53 AM CST
Name: Terese
Leesburg, FL zone9b
Wisconsin Dells Area, zone4
JB wrote:The time on this thread is still on daylight time. Our daylight time changed a week or so ago.........just curious what time it is?


By looking at the time stamp... it's an hour off for me, probably can be adjusted in ones 'personal settings' -- I know Davesgarden is off for me too. I get this every time change.

And for the seeds question.... I know some folks to sell plants or what they produce at Farmers Markets and the sort... I grow them for my own gardens.

I also do not Winter Sow in the quantities that I used to.... no time or space... Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing

Terese -- Leesburg, FL & Lake Delton, Wi
My Email is my userID at hotmail.com

Imagestarlight1153
Nov 19, 2013 10:20 AM CST
Name: starlight1153 Zone 8a/b
AL.
JB I can't get your link to open. Something not right. Just at bottom of post click upload image and try that away.

So glad ya got new babies. Just becareful that you don't let them get too chilled during early morning and at night. Don't want them to get frost bit. Big plants it easy to work with. Seedlings take a lot of trial and error and just like any tiny tot, a lot of work and patience.

Sometimes, even the most experienced gardeners will have some beautiful seedlings or plants and end up losing them. But they will try again. All a part of being a gardener.

Yep, lots and lots of work, which is why during planting and growing season other than checking in now and than for questions or updates, most folks disappear from threads. Too busy outside. A gardeners work is never done. Those in the South are out watering during winter and dealing with major fluctuation temps and hoping for enough cold to germinate stuff and kill the bugs, but not so much to damage plants.

Folks inNorth may get a few months rest with all the snow, but than come spring they dealing with major thaws which causes floods and they have a lot of heaving and rot to deal with too.Gardening is a challenge no matter where you live. You have to love it. But once you start learning and get more skillful, the more you will want to grow and than you become a seed and plant -aholic. Rolling on the floor laughing

Every year, from piggies I learn about new plants. So many I have nevr even heard of. I'll spend hours looking up some of the seed and info about the plants. Some I will try even though they supposedly won't grow in my zone, but just too beautiful to not give a try.

There all kids of folks in this swap. Some are commercial growers, some are growers tryign to feed family and share with neighbors extras and some are backyard growers. Growing for their own pleasure and delight.

Most the seed oinked for will stay with the person oinking, but if they have extra or maybe do get something they don't like the seed will get passed on and you never know where it will come from. One time a way back had traded some seed. That seed left that person traveled half way round the world and than ended up back with me from another trade. Laughed my head off. Ya just never know.

What ya need to know is we are seed addicts. Rolling on the floor laughing Now we will plant as many seed as we can, but I don't think there is one piggy who has managed to plant every type of seed they got, could be wrong though. Than depending on seed, some you have to wait almost a year to plant it. Say it says plant in fall, well seed ya getting in Jan, Feb has to wait to be planted til Sept and Oct and than you may have to wait two years if a biennial before it will bloom and produce seed.

Now don't be sad if worse comes to worse and you lose your babies. We will try and help. Biggest thing is keeping gnats away and damping off disease from too much water. If ya do, at least you have learned how to germinate them and can try again. Smiling

Now ya ready to try and germinate Spider plant seeds if you haven't done that already? That is if you have some seed. If not save some next time.


I watched a program yesterday and guy was having to cook for 125 people special meal. He was using fresh cantaloupe and muskmelon balls. He went out to local farmer actually over here in Ga. The farmer gave him two types of cantaloupe to taste. The one was called Heart of Gold. beautiful, full of flavor melon. Sweet and juicy. Harder to grow and not as much yield. The other melon not sure if he said name or not, was what most all the commercial growers around country are using. Farmer said, not too many problems growing it early harvest and a high yield, but lacks full flavor and definitely not as sweet. You could tell just by looking at the insides of both melons. Course the chef went with the Heart of Gold.

I am a big big fan of cantaloupe. I get so excited when I know it season for it. I will eat it everyday if I can. I hate to say how many melons I have bought this year not only from different stores, but from a few local growers that I have had bad melons from. They are hard as a rock, no taste and definitely o juice to them. When I was in grocery yesterday looked longingly at melon,,,,,,,. Wanted one so bad, but wasn't about to waste money to have to throw in garbage. Ended up getting some grapes instead.

Anymore, even with the local growers I am asking what type they are growing. Pretty looking fruits and veggies can be deceiving. So I am waiting til the end of the season and hoping I can get some melon that might be a later harder to grow, sweeter crop. Crossing my fingers anyways.

With me not having a sniffer. I really have to rely on my taste buds for things. Maybe it just me, but I swear some of these new hybrids are good ad tasty and well worth growing, but there alot and seems to be corn especially that tastes like nasty medicine, which I wonder if it not the chems in them.





ImageMistirose
Nov 19, 2013 10:21 AM CST
Name: Misti
Fate, TX
I'm here too! JB I grow as much as I can to avoid all the crap they are doing to our food supply these days. I'm now trying to grow more heirloom varieties as I have learned a lot of the vitamins and such have been bred out of our current veggies and a lot of breeds are already extinct. You are no bother, we are all here to chat and have fun! Hurray!
Imagejoseph
Nov 19, 2013 10:38 AM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
starlight1153 wrote:With breeding and all the different components Joseph looks for to try and bring the best and hardiest, it really helps him to have a hands on visual.


The collaboration is tremendously helpful. I have crop failures, and seeds get lost, and bugs or mice eat things, and the family cleans the house, or combines different kinds of seeds, and some things just won't grow well here, but they thrive in slightly warmer climates. More than a few times collaborators have returned seeds that I treasure but managed to lose in one way or another. Or they take my seed and do a project that I just couldn't pull off. For example, when I first planted my butternut landrace I included Seminole Pumpkins (the wild progenitor). Alas my season is way to short and cold for a variety more at home in the Florida Everglades. Seminole didn't even flower for me. A collaborator made the cross and returned the offspring to me. Oh my heck. I am so pleased with that. The squash tasted bland, and lacked the orange flesh that I look for, but I am thrilled with the genetic diversity. There might be something valuable in the genes that wasn't brought over into butternut when it was originally domesticated.

That's part of the reason why I am keen on sharing the high carotene (vitamin A) corn seed. Because someone might do something really clever with it, and because that gets it into the living seed bank instead of into a storage freezer.


Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
ImageCCvacation
Nov 19, 2013 11:12 AM CST
Name: CC
PA
Add to my posts...
CC
Imagestarlight1153
Nov 19, 2013 11:19 AM CST
Name: starlight1153 Zone 8a/b
AL.
Joseph next season when things start harvesting, I'll try to remember to remind Piggies if they can and want to send ya something they grew from your seed.

I know what ya mean. While I haven't done it with veggies yet, got to get my veggie hybridizing technique down and better, I have farmed out plants that I grew from seed to others. Sometimes it was because I knew it may not survive the heat and drought here and didn't want to lose the plant or to see how it would do in other parts of country and if it would increase for them. I have had not only had divisions of mine come back, but some babies they made crossing with mine. So cool to see what was developed.

One of the things I wonder, and I not really sure of the answer, with flowers, and registering new hybrids there is a lot of paperwork and in some cases if you working from a cross somebody else did , you have to list that person and have their permission. Is it the same with veggies.

I wish I could remember the site I was on the other day while hunting up a cultivar. It said something about how that say you have a special corn and you name it and resister it, that folks couldn't use that name, but after two years the genetics in that seed was up for grabs. Do you know this to be true?

If so, than maybe some of the big companies that think they have exclusives, may have to name but not the genetics of the seed and anybody can work with it.

ImageAndi
Nov 19, 2013 11:31 AM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
JB, How Exciting! Sprouts are such a happy sight. Very hopeful. One feels such a sense of accomplishment.

I hope you get some interesting plants.

When I start seeds inside, I use sterile potting medium. (I sterilize it in the oven). I sprinkle cinnamon on the surface, mix it in and sprinkle more for good measure. I water with a bit of hydrogen peroxide in the water. I haven't migrated my links from my crashed computer to this one yet. I learned about watering with peroxide from this group. maybe someone else has the link handy.

I garden as a hobby. there aren't many gardeners in this area. Plant selection is limited to big box stores and nurseries selling the same varieties as the big box stores for much higher prices.

The piggies are such interesting and experienced gardeners - growing such interesting plants and helping the other piggies grow them also!

You can still join us, jb. When you see how much fun we are having with our seeds this winter and spring, you are going to wish that you joined us!
Mindy03
Nov 19, 2013 11:36 AM CST
Name: Margaret
Delta KY
I'm A Charley's Girl For Sure
JB So excited for you on the babies. I hope you keep right on popping in to chat with us because I find your posts interesting.
ImageDayjillymo
Nov 19, 2013 11:56 AM CST
Name: Jill
NW Missouri
Joseph - do you worry at all about the genetically modified problems with corn especially? I realize any cross pollination is technically generically modified, but the newly labeled GMO changes don't seem as innocent as cross pollination.

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