Cottage Gardening forum: #11 Almost Piggy Seed Swap Time Chat Thread!!

 
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ImageBluespiral
Oct 20, 2014 7:49 PM CST
I don't have links or references, but I seem to recall reading that hundreds of millions of years ago, when all of Earth's land masses were gathered into one super continent, that Ginkgo covered two-thirds of that continent.

Who'da thunk that the same planet that could host dreams of Shakespeare's banks of thyme and violets and daffiedownlilies could ever have had a Ginkgo moment like that Rolling on the floor laughing ?
My religion is simple. My religion is kindness. Dalai Lama
ImageMistirose
Oct 20, 2014 9:48 PM CST
Name: Misti
Fate, TX
Beautiful babies Star! I cant wait to adopt some Hurray! I added them to my wish list. I really like the red. I want to plant them around our tree in the front yard and maybe at the mailbox. Lovey dubby Good idea with the pennies but no metal detector here lol
Imagejoseph
Oct 20, 2014 10:15 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

I'll trust your judgement and skip the ginko.

I meant to write that the lambsquarter's weeds thrived in the greenhouse. They are from the amaranth family but are not typically called amaranth, except that pretty much everything from the amaranth family is banned from my garden because they cause me so many weed problems.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Imagewildflowers
Oct 21, 2014 2:01 PM CST
Name: Christine
Northeast Texas, Zone 7b
I had some lambsquarter show up in one of my raised beds this year. I thought I would let it stay and I could gather seeds of it but when that thing grew over six feet tall I decided it had to go! Rolling on the floor laughing I put it over in the 'To be burned pile' and now there are baby lambsquarter plants growing there.

Snort snort... yummy looking Surprise Liliy Bulbs! Lovey dubby
FAITH over fear!

Imagejoseph
Oct 21, 2014 8:01 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

A few weeks ago I got sick at about midnight. My stomach hurt like heck. Last time I had that much stomach pain was just before my appendix was removed.

So I got on the Internet, and looked up the species of fruit that I had eaten, and used a magic marker to write the species name on my chest, so that if I croaked during the night at least my family would know why....

Some years ago I sent potato seeds to a lady, and she planted them, and then told me later in the growing season about the potatoes with gorgeous purple berries. I told her that I had never seen purple berries on potatoes before. So she promptly sent me seeds. I stuck them in with my potato seeds to be trialed and forgot about them for a couple years.

This spring I planted a bunch of mixed potato seeds in a flat, and then screened them by selecting the most vigorous growing ones for transplant into the garden. The potato crop did not grow right... They were not potatoes, but something like a garden huckleberry. I let them grow until the fruits ripened to a deep purple, and then decided that it was time to harvest the fruits. And since I like to taste the produce before saving seeds, I ate a bunch of berries from every plant, or two or three. They tasted fantastic.

The symptoms of Solanum nigrum poisoning show up about 6 hours after eating....

Next time I was in the garden, I pulled every plant, and put them in the dumpster. I am highly adverse to putting organic matter into the landfill and thus throwing away my wealth, but I made an exception for the plants that had given me nightshade poisoning.



Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Imagechristine00
Oct 22, 2014 7:56 AM CST
Name: christine
kentucky
glad you are ok Joseph!
Imagegreene
Oct 22, 2014 8:15 AM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, Georgia, USA
Why in the world would you eat berries from a plant without first getting a positive identification?
What did you eat? Was it Atropa balladonna = Deadly Nightshade which is toxic, or was it Solanum Nigrum = Black Nightshade which is safe to eat ONLY if the berries are completely ripe?

http://www.rootsimple.com/2011/11/deadly-nightshade-vs-black...

I am growing Solanum americanum and, because so many plants have a similar appearance, I obtained the seeds from a trusted source.

http://www.eattheweeds.com/american-nightshade-a-much-malign...

Joseph, we love you. I am happy that you are feeling better, but please, please do not ever again do that. Lovey dubby
Imagestarlight1153
Oct 22, 2014 8:59 AM CST
Name: starlight1153 Zone 8a/b
AL.
Joseph.... So glad your ok. That was a close call for sure. I've had a few myself. One was a reaction to Sponge mushrooms. Boy they were so good going down. I've had to call poison control just from handling a poisonous seed that had cracked open and had the powder on my hands.

Very smart the idea using the magic marker. Females, best to write on the forehead. I remember being young and my grandfather wiriting I eat red worms on the foreheads of all us kids. Took days to get that off so everywhere we went we had that saying all across the face for folks to see. Whistling Hilarious!

When I first came to live here, I would find wild nightshade plants show up occasionally. Once, I found out what they were, I would rip and throw them in the trash. Next door and I had some plants come up in places that were in the Solanum family that we knew we didn't plant and couldn't fully identify. Out and trashed they went.

I don't know if you have seen this site or not. I keep it bookmarked. The information written is way older, but I still use it as a guide. Since your just getting into herbs, medicinal and botanicals, you might find it comes in handy.
Sent the link on Night Shade, but you can click to get to the home page and see all the different plants and info.

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/n/nighbl04.html

Here is another site you might enjoy.

http://www.ediblewildfood.com/

In the first paragraph is blue links to look at pages and info of edible weeds, flowers and at the top of those pages, other links for recipes and such.

I've discovered several edible plants that I consider weeds in the yard from this site. One is Goldenrod. I have patches of it growing all over. Not only did I learn it was edible for humans, but when it is in bloom the bees work it like crazy for pollen.

http://www.ediblewildfood.com/goldenrod.aspx

Heck, if I got every plant I consider a weed in my yard I may just have enough types that I would never have to grow a regular veggie again, especially all the ones growing in the back fields. Hilarious!
ImageJonnaSudenius
Oct 22, 2014 11:50 AM CST
Name: Jonna
Belgium, Europe
greene wrote:Why in the world would you eat berries from a plant without first getting a positive identification?

Joseph, we love you. I am happy that you are feeling better, but please, please do not ever again do that. Lovey dubby


I agree
I agree
Imagejoseph
Oct 22, 2014 2:29 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

Well... If I am going to try to grow new and unusual edibles, then I have to taste them. And after all, someone did go to the trouble of collecting the seed and sending it to me...

The berries of Solanum nigrum that I ate were very ripe, and very delicious, and very upsetting. They probably would have been fine if I had cooked them rather than eating them raw.

The worst berry I have eaten was a ripe potato berry. It was very sweet, but immediately emetic. So no possibility of poisoning from that one. I'd toss my cookies before it could take effect.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Imagegreene
Oct 22, 2014 5:00 PM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, Georgia, USA
Joseph, did you take detailed photos of the plant you are calling Solanum nigrum?
Imagejoseph
Oct 22, 2014 6:58 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
greene wrote:Joseph, did you take detailed photos of the plant you are calling Solanum nigrum?


No.

Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Imagejoseph
Oct 22, 2014 7:20 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
One of the projects I am working on is to create a new species: a perennial watermelon. One of the parents is poisonous, so if I ever get far enough along in the project that the new species exists, then the next step will be to taste lots of poisonous plants in hopes of finding a few that are not poisonous.

I currently do that with other cucurbits: C pepo, and C melo. I grow lots of Solanum tuberosum from seed. Sometimes the tubers are quite poisonous. Don't know until I taste them. Bleck!!!

And the beans. Ugh. I suppose that I am always flirting with phytohaemagglutinin poisoning. At least that poison is a spitter.


Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited Oct 22, 2014 7:55 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1093708 (13)
Imagejoseph
Oct 22, 2014 11:12 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
Another poisonous nightshade that I've tasted a few times this summer: From the Nicotiana genus. If I get my act together I may have seeds to share. I was very surprised that it made seed for me. I certainly wasn't expecting seeds. Typical of my usual luck regarding warm weather crops, about 98% of the seeds that I planted failed to reproduce. But like I always say, that is great odds for localizing a crop to my garden.

Thumb of 2014-10-23/joseph/82e8d8
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited Oct 22, 2014 11:13 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1093730 (14)
Imagegreene
Oct 23, 2014 7:53 PM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, Georgia, USA
Starlight/Ella,
PlantSister has discovered some new and less expensive way to send out international mail. It is called 'ISAL' (International Surface Air Lift) from USA to the other country. [It may have a different name in other countries.] She sent me a USPS link, but I think it would be easier to go the the post office and ask the clerk if ISAL is available and if it would be more economical. When folks gets ready to mail to other countries this method may save some money?
Imagejoseph
Oct 24, 2014 9:20 AM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity


The berries that I saved for seed and didn't get around to eating. Deposited into the landfill right after the photo was taken.
Thumb of 2014-10-24/joseph/617db0
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
PlantSister
Oct 24, 2014 10:20 AM CST
Name: PlantSister
southeast Asia
It is difficult for me to see the sepals in your photo, sorry, but to my eyes they do not look like the curve away.

On the edible plant Solanum americanum the sepals do not adhere to the fruit. They are curved away from the fruit. There is a good photo here:
http://www.eattheweeds.com/american-nightshade-a-much-malign...

Imagejoseph
Oct 24, 2014 10:38 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
I already got rid of the berries, but I found a close-up photo of the sepals.

Thumb of 2014-10-25/joseph/e30faf

Thumb of 2014-10-25/joseph/ce9bec


http://www.eattheweeds.com/american-nightshade-a-much-maligned-edible/ wrote: "3) The S. nigrum has DULL black berries when ripe, and they tend to be larger than the other two. Also the stems of the berries do not emerge from one single point but are separated slightly on the stem, staggered like a spike."


Based on that, I'd ID it as S. nigrum.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited Oct 24, 2014 10:48 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1094038 (18)
Imagewildflowers
Oct 25, 2014 7:02 AM CST
Name: Christine
Northeast Texas, Zone 7b
Eat the Weeds has some good info.

Because of all the confusion about Black Nightshade, Solanum nigrum, etal, I did quite a bit of "Googling" on the plant awhile back. It started after I saw my chickens eating the ripe berries of a nightshade variety.. not sure which one.

I found some interesting info and varied arguments about whether or not it is poisonous, let alone the deadly Black Nightshade it is said to be.

Joseph, or anyone interested ~ This is a very interesting read by Sam Thayer from his book called Forager's Harvest Basically, he is detailing his finding that S. nigrum is not poisonous and is edible and how he searched but couldn't find any documented deaths or illness from eating the berries:
http://foragersharvest.com/black-nightshade-2/ (I had to 'right click' and 'select all' to see the whole article).

And this is an old article from my local County Extension Agent for Agriculture: http://www.frontporchnewstexas.com/mariocolumn061811.htm

After all of my searching, I'm still conflicted about the plant. Although, my chickens never showed any signs of being sick after I saw them eating the berries.

Here's the plant which looks more like the edible version.

Looking for pics...
FAITH over fear!

[Last edited Oct 25, 2014 9:01 AM CST]
Quote | Post #1094063 (19)
Imagejoseph
Oct 25, 2014 8:59 AM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

Yesterday I finished harvesting. Then I tilled the fields back to bare soil.

I already planted some peas that I am testing for winter hardiness, and a little tiny patch of winter wheat as a cover crop (takes gobs of seed to plant two acres, thus the tiny patch). I have two rows of garlic already sprouted. I need to plant more garlic, and I want to trial sum winter spinach.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse

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