Cottage Gardening forum: 2014 Seed Swap Chatter #4

 
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EricaBraun
Dec 8, 2014 6:44 PM CST
Name: Erica Braun
Benicia, CA
Ella -- Kinda like how you feed and pamper us piggies? Sticking tongue out
Imagejoseph
Dec 8, 2014 7:13 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
I do charity plantings occasionally. One time a lady stranger stopped at my garden and asked me if I would plant two pumpkin plants for her. They were from her brother's pumpkin, and "Last year the fruit weighed 1500 pounds". I told her to bring them by and I'd toss them in with my other squash. Without fertilizer, or special care other than minimal weeding and once a week irrigation they produced fruits weighing around 100 pounds.

Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited Dec 8, 2014 10:18 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1106606 (2)
ImageAndi
Dec 8, 2014 8:55 PM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
Growing big pumpkins puts gardening in the news every Thanksgiving. Maybe more people will start planting things. I am more interested in growing tasty pumpkins, but to each his/her own. I get a kick out of the casper, blue and warty pumpkins too.

Computers are still working. big sigh of relief. I didn't want to have to hand label the rest of my seeds.
Weedwhacker
Dec 8, 2014 9:53 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Michigan UP (Zone 4b or 5a)
Some of the people that grow those humongous pumpkins win some pretty significant $$ ! I watched one of the competitions on TV last fall -- can't remember where it was, but the festival was right by a lake and after all the weighing and prize awarding there was another contest using the pumpkins as one-man boats -- looked like they were having a lot of fun with that!

The only time I tried growing a "big" pumpkin I planted "Atlantic Giant" (I think), and just as it was getting to a pretty impressive size (nothing like those lunkers you see on TV, though -- more like what Joseph is talking about and maybe not even that big) a deer gnawed a hole in it and ate all the innards, leaving me just a Cinderella's coach; I didn't realize it until a gardening friend stopped over and i was all excited to take him out to the garden to see my huge pumpkin... Rolling on the floor laughing
"I am still learning"~~ Michelangelo
National Gardening Association
Imagerisingcreek
Dec 9, 2014 12:09 AM CST
Name: kacee
southern california
I would just like to grow kid sized pumpkins that can be carved. this year I only got 1 or 2 per vine. is that normal? I would like to grow enough for my grandkids and some extras for them to share. is there a variety that would be best for this?
Imagejoseph
Dec 9, 2014 12:38 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

Rising Creek: One to two fruits per pumpkin plant is typical. Plant more seeds for more fruits... Fruit size will get progressively smaller as they get more crowded, but 7 to 8 seeds per hill with hills spaced about 3 to 4 feet apart works well for my daddy. I plant in a long row with seeds spaced 6" to 12" apart.

Connecticut Field Pumpkin is our workhorse pumpkin variety around here.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Imagerisingcreek
Dec 9, 2014 1:04 PM CST
Name: kacee
southern california
joseph

thank you so much, I didnt realize that was the norm. dont feel so bad now. I think I have some conn. field seeds so will try them next year.
ImageRickCorey
Dec 9, 2014 1:24 PM CST
Name: Rick Corey
Pacific NorthWet Zone 8a
Joseph, thanks for the short-season sweet pepper! I see I couldn't tempt you with anything this year. I guess that, if you aren't into greens, my list is very short!

I appreciate the reminder that putting our screen name on each seed packet is helpful. I kind of got out of that habit. Next year!



Imagejoseph
Dec 9, 2014 3:41 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

RickCorey: Every year I've gotten choi from you, and every year I fail it, or the weather does... I still have backup seed, so I'd be embarrassed to oink for more. My intention this year is to start it in the greenhouse and transplant. Eventually I want a variety of Brassica rapa that I can plant in the spring, and maybe get a harvest of greens, and maybe not, but that produces an abundant seed crop for me that I can use as sprouting seeds.

The only time I successfully grew pac choi was when I bought plants from the nursery. It was a glorious crop. I think the second thing that I harvested that year after Egyptian onions.

Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
ImageRickCorey
Dec 9, 2014 4:27 PM CST
Name: Rick Corey
Pacific NorthWet Zone 8a
I don't know for sure that flowering Bok Choy (Yu Choi Sum) would produce a LARGE crop of seeds, but it was selected for its seed stalks. It bolts early and I assume most things hybridized with it would also bolt early.

Of course, it kind of negates their value as greens crops, if they put up flower stalks before the leaves get large.

I'm surprised these Asian Brassica greens fail on you. They should be pretty cold-tolerant, even frost-tolerant after the seedlings are up. On the other hand, if their soil dries out, it wouldn't surprise me if they just gave up. They do like consistently moist soil.

I think that Tatsoi is the most cold-tolerant, unless Tyfon (Holland Greens) has that distinction. Tyfon is a stabilized cross between stubble turnips and Chinese cabbage.
ImageSorellina
Dec 9, 2014 4:49 PM CST
Name: Julianna
Victoria, BC USDA Zone 8
If I ever get around to threshing it, I'll have a whole boatload of Komatsuna to offer next year. I can't promise it will be true because I do plant a lot of Asian brassicas together, but it would be fun to grow out and see for any adventurous gardeners. Regardless, whatever greens come of it should be tasty!
Grazie a tutti,
Julianna
Imagejoseph
Dec 9, 2014 6:10 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
RickCorey wrote:I'm surprised these Asian Brassica greens fail on you. They should be pretty cold-tolerant, even frost-tolerant after the seedlings are up. On the other hand, if their soil dries out, it wouldn't surprise me if they just gave up. They do like consistently moist soil.


It's desert out here... Some years I have complete crop failures on every brassica family crop, due to fickle spring rains before our irrigation system becomes active. Transplants do fine, because they can be planted deep enough to get into the residual winter moisture. Also, flea beetles are a tremendous problem in my fields first thing in the spring. Seedlings really struggle. Transplants can outgrow the predation.

This is the first year I have had a greenhouse available to grow brassicas. I put it up just in time to start tomatoes last year. I stopped operating a CSA because I had complete crop failures on brassicas two years in a row, and that was not acceptable to me.

Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Imagechelle
Dec 9, 2014 7:32 PM CST
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana
Mmmm...

I just got the newest Rare Seeds catalog in the mail. It's truly a seed-lover's work of art. Big Yellow Grin

Wondering now if anyone has a few seeds of Blue Berries tomato and/or Doux d` Espagne peppers to share?
If not, I probably will have next year. *Blush*
ImageArleneB
Dec 9, 2014 7:43 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA
Chelle, I got that catalog the other day! It is beautiful! I haven't had time to look through it but what I did see makes me think I will be placing an order from them too!
Imagechelle
Dec 9, 2014 8:35 PM CST
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana
A'yup. Big Yellow Grin

I've only made it to the Blue Berries tomatoes myself, but I really can't wait to peruse the rest of it.
Weedwhacker
Dec 9, 2014 9:06 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Michigan UP (Zone 4b or 5a)
LOL, I just got the Rare Seeds Catalog too ... never mind the listings, what a beautiful cover!!

I think I am on seed overload at the moment .... Hilarious!
"I am still learning"~~ Michelangelo
National Gardening Association
Imagebluee19
Dec 9, 2014 9:12 PM CST
Name: Bluee19 Huynh
Rosemead CA
I got the catalog today too and was perusing and wishing for so many of those tomatoes. Hoping we can share :)
[Last edited Dec 9, 2014 9:12 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1106823 (17)
EricaBraun
Dec 9, 2014 9:12 PM CST
Name: Erica Braun
Benicia, CA
So, funny. I received my catalog yesterday, as well. It's funny how you can get so engrosed in something that you have no idea where the time went. I was just going to look at a few pages, but I ended up looking through the whole thing. As if I need more seeds, with how wonderful you all have been!
soilsandup
Dec 10, 2014 1:35 AM CST
Name: Dianne
Sacramento, CA, zone 9a
Popping in just before the end of the swap to say hello. I will have to spend some time going over all the chatter that has been taking place. You guys always have the most interesting topics.

For all you piggies - here are some photos of your African cousins - Warthogs. We were having lunch and these warthogs wandered by, along with monkeys. A mommy and her two babies.


Thumb of 2014-12-10/soilsandup/113f9e
Thumb of 2014-12-10/soilsandup/c08aee
EricaBraun
Dec 10, 2014 1:44 AM CST
Name: Erica Braun
Benicia, CA
Super cute!

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