Cottage Gardening forum: Seed Arrival -- Let's chat about it #6

 
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Imagetcs1366
Jan 22, 2015 5:12 PM CST
Name: Terese
Leesburg, FL zone9b
Wisconsin Dells Area, zone4
Last thread was really long.... and with the arrival of our seed packages... Let's all chat about seeds and the sowing of....

we came from here -- > http://cubits.org/ellasgarden/thread/view/80833/

Thumb of 2015-01-22/tcs1366/3a093f
Terese -- Leesburg, FL & Lake Delton, Wi
My Email is my userID at hotmail.com

Imagestarlight1153
Jan 22, 2015 5:37 PM CST
Name: starlight1153 Zone 8a/b
AL.
I'm here! I have no idea yet what I have except for beets. Lots and lots of beets. Hilarious!
Imagetcs1366
Jan 22, 2015 6:17 PM CST
Name: Terese
Leesburg, FL zone9b
Wisconsin Dells Area, zone4
I can not believe all the wonderful seeds I got today. So many "gifts/extras"

thanks to all who participated in this swap... it's the only one I do and always get such great seeds.
Terese -- Leesburg, FL & Lake Delton, Wi
My Email is my userID at hotmail.com

ImageRickCorey
Jan 22, 2015 6:45 PM CST
Name: Rick Corey
Pacific NorthWet Zone 8a
I finally caught up on the #5 chat thread, and here we are at #6!


LeBug, there is an over-kill method for equalizing presure on a slope. Bring the main line all the way up the slope. Say that has 40 psi at the bottom and 30 psi at the top (23 feet of rise).

Then put Tees and 30 psi pressure regulators every 5-10 feet along the mainline, and run horizontal soaker hoses from each 30 psi regulator. Expensive and some work!

Or use pressure-compensating dripline, 1/4" or 1/2". Or pressure-compensating sprayers if wtaer is not too expensive. Those emit almost the same amount over some pressure rnage like 15-30 psi. PC drippers and sprayers may also be more clog-resistant than non-PC drippers.


Promise, once seedlings have put ANY green abiove the soil line, even just seedling leaves, it is best to remove any humidity hood or plastic film. Now that they have emerged, humidity is their enemy since it encourages damping off. A small fan, or intermittent fan, or drafts are all good for seedlings unless your air is bone-dry and hot or warm.


GA-3
I read somewhere, I think in one of Dr Deno's books, a rationale for why GA-3 is helpful to alpine seeds. They needed a mechanism that would let seeds blow around on rocky surfaces until they wound up somewhere a seedling might find a bit of soil.

On those slopes, soil comes from lichens breaking down rock into flakes, grit and sand. For example, a dip or crack in the rock where grit and soil and lichens can wash in and collect.

His idea was that plants evolved seeds that could detect GA-3, (which is mostly only produced by lichens). The seeds "knew" their chances were better where lichens were, than on a bare rocky slope. I would call that "co-evolution".


Andy said:
>> I need to study growing oriental vegetables so that I plant them at the right time. Does anyone have any favorite links?

Brassicas are mostly cool-season crops, and many are cold-hardy. For example, Tatsoi, Komatsuna and Bok Choy are frost-hardy. Cold and heat tolerance vary by variety - they are bred and selected for early and late cool, cold and warm seasons.

I see advice for direct-sowing Bok Choy before the last frost, plus every few weeks until mature plants would hit excessive summer heat. But I'm not that ambitious. I sow after the last frost. You can also sow in late summer or fall, and expect them to survive through a few frosts.

Keep their soil moist!

Chinese cabbage are fussier about temperatures and day-length - mostly fall crops or need to be started indoors. For those (Napa and Michihli) I would look up local advice.

As a first approximation, you can plant Asian Brassica greens a little like broccoli, but I think many are more cold-hardy than broccoli (I have never grown broccoli.)


Seed sprouts and microgreens are naturals for seed-savers. Let some bolt and collect lots of seeds for next season. If 10-20 % cross-pollinate, well gee, adding variety to a salad mix, how tragic would that be?

Imagejoseph
Jan 22, 2015 6:49 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

Weeee. weeee. weeeeee.
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Weedwhacker
Jan 22, 2015 6:50 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Michigan UP (Zone 4b or 5a)
Ooooooh -- latest update says mine has made it as far as Oshkosh, WI -- still saying Friday for expected delivery, so crossing my little piggy hooves! Smiling

Spent half the day trying to get the scanner part of my 'all-in-one' printer working (again) -- to no avail Sticking tongue out

I've had this problem before so I'm essentially sure it can be resolved -- but just not sure how Rolling on the floor laughing
(why don't I write this stuff down??)
"I am still learning"~~ Michelangelo
National Gardening Association
Weedwhacker
Jan 22, 2015 6:56 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Michigan UP (Zone 4b or 5a)
RickCorey -- so lichens produce GA-3 ?? Can I do something with lichens to produce a GA-3 - like solution (or something) for seed sprouting?
"I am still learning"~~ Michelangelo
National Gardening Association
Imagechelle
Jan 22, 2015 7:17 PM CST
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana
RickCorey wrote:




GA-3
I read somewhere, I think in one of Dr Deno's books, a rationale for why GA-3 is helpful to alpine seeds. They needed a mechanism that would let seeds blow around on rocky surfaces until they wound up somewhere a seedling might find a bit of soil.

On those slopes, soil comes from lichens breaking down rock into flakes, grit and sand. For example, a dip or crack in the rock where grit and soil and lichens can wash in and collect.

His idea was that plants evolved seeds that could detect GA-3, (which is mostly only produced by lichens). The seeds "knew" their chances were better where lichens were, than on a bare rocky slope. I would call that "co-evolution".




Fascinating info, Rick! Hurray!

I tip my hat to you. Thank you!
Imagecritterologist
Jan 22, 2015 7:47 PM CST
Name: Critter (Jill)
MD
For running irrigation lines up a slope... I don't think you have to put pressure regulators at every "T." It's just the drip or soakers that can't go up/down-hill (unless they're teh pressure compensating type). Get out your electrical diagrams from high school physics... you can connect pretty much all you want to IN PARALLEL without building up too much resistance in the line... it's when you start connecting things in SERIES (end to end) that things can go haywire in a hurry.

When you run a supply line out from your faucet, you can put X or T connectors along that line and then run 50 foot soaker hoses (or drip irrigation lines) out from each connection. You could do that with hundreds of feet of soaker hose, as each section connected to the supply line is in parallel with the other sections. But any individual sections -- any of the soaker lines going out from the supply line -- can't be more than 100 feet long or go up & down hill more than a couple of feet in elevation. You could connect a 50 foot soaker to the supply line and connect another 50 foot soaker to that one (in series, see?), but that's the limit.

At least, that's my understanding and the easiest way I can think of to explain it... even if I was awful at physics!


Circles of Support for Breast Cancer
I'm learning to dance in the rain! Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
ImageMistirose
Jan 22, 2015 7:51 PM CST
Name: Misti
Fate, TX
Mine are here! Thank you all for the wonderful seeds and awesome swap again this year! Thank you Star for all you do for us and I do hope you feel better soon! Lovey dubby
Imagetcs1366
Jan 22, 2015 9:22 PM CST
Name: Terese
Leesburg, FL zone9b
Wisconsin Dells Area, zone4
oh... yea... Ella -- I did not receive the pepper packet either. Hopefully it will show up... it's not in the frig or freezer?
Terese -- Leesburg, FL & Lake Delton, Wi
My Email is my userID at hotmail.com

EricaBraun
Jan 23, 2015 12:05 AM CST
Name: Erica Braun
Benicia, CA
I did not receive the missing peppers either.

I'm still playing with my seeds, but I wanted to come back and thank everyone again! For those of you that sent me bonus seeds, thank you so much. My pack is marvelous! I'm hoping to get a lot of stuff started over the weekend. For now, I'm in the process of researching and cataloging all these precious seeds.
Imagepmb2005
Jan 23, 2015 5:46 AM CST
Name: Promise
Zone 7a Tennessee
critter You are talking about what I am researching. This the drip irrigation system I am looking at.... https://www.dripdepot.com/category/529cbe7275eb51467e2f0700

We would probably get the small farm kit and customize it, because I think according to their measurements I'm a little bigger than a small farm. Anyways, with what you are saying, I will need to measure from the faucet down the hill because you say the main line shouldn't be longer than 100feet? My backyard goes downhill, wouldn't that improve water flow via gravity? I never took physics. I'm thinking my setup will be perfect for a drip line, but I am intimidated by the investment of it. How long will the drip line last? Is there a better place to purchase the drip line? That website is Google Trusted so I began my researching there. What about covering the drip line with weed control fabric? I don't want to spend all my time weeding and I don't want those darn weeds getting ahead of me either. Grumbling weeeeeeeds!!

star The cart and buggy brought my package to Knoxville last night! It's getting closer!!!
Imagepmb2005
Jan 23, 2015 6:14 AM CST
Name: Promise
Zone 7a Tennessee
Holy moly! Diapers can help you reduce watering and save your plants? Anyone ever tried using the diaper gel?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXb8rJ8Rm3I
Imagechelle
Jan 23, 2015 6:24 AM CST
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana
I've tried diapers in flower pots, but I like compost better. It seemed like a good experiment for a few of the leftovers...once my child didn't need them anymore, but it's still a stopgap. Sure, it reduces frequency of watering, but it doesn't do anything else for the plants...and you still have to dispose of them after use...messy.

(I haven't watched the video, so if I'm off-base here, just disregard. Whistling )
Imagestarlight1153
Jan 23, 2015 6:46 AM CST
Name: starlight1153 Zone 8a/b
AL.
I tried diapers at one time too. Wasn't impressed. Only thing they did work good for was laying plants on top of wet diapers if you went away for a few days. The bottom of pots would wick up the moisture from out of diaper.

Instead of diapers, which you really have no idea of the chems used int he process of making them, just cuz they safe for babies doesn't mean they safe for plants, you can buy water saving crystals to add to your soil. One of the problems that happens though especially with newbie gardeners is that they have a tendency to feel the top fo the pot or just top few inches of soil. They think it is dry and water the plant. That plant already has all those water crystals in it and they can only hold so much water and so the plants roots are getting soaked and wet feet and rotting.

I tell folks, especially if they new to gardening that if they use Moisture Control soil or add crystals to their soil to get themselves a bbq kabob stick or long enough popsicle stick and stick in pot and let sit for about 15 minutes. Pull it out and look at stick. If there plenty of water at roots, the stick will show moisture on it and they don't need to water.
Imagepmb2005
Jan 23, 2015 6:47 AM CST
Name: Promise
Zone 7a Tennessee
Oh oh oh!!! My Piggy Package is at my local post office!!! Please let it say out for delivery! Please let is say out for delivery!
Imagestarlight1153
Jan 23, 2015 6:58 AM CST
Name: starlight1153 Zone 8a/b
AL.
Promise I can hear your piggy hoofs prancing like crazy all aroudn the room way down here. Hilarious!

Got recipes and advice?

http://cubits.org/ellasgarden/forums/view/gardencooking/
plantnutz
Jan 23, 2015 7:41 AM CST
Name: Brenda
7b
Thanks to all for sharing your wonderful seed with me. I look forward to growing all these beauties.

No big bag of peppers here either Ella.

It's a cold rainy day here in Georgia and I plan to spend some time in the garage getting some things ready for winter sowing.

Thanks again everyone!!
Imagecritterologist
Jan 23, 2015 7:44 AM CST
Name: Critter (Jill)
MD
It's the soaker hoses that shouldn't run more than 100 feet IN SERIES. (Some say 200 feet, but I find that doesn't work as well, possibly because my yard isn't perfectly flat.) The supply line can be as long as you want... its job is to fill up the soakers and irrigation lines with water. If each of the filled-up lines start getting too long or varying too much in elevation, that's when you start having issues. For drip irrigation, go with whatever maximum run the manufacturer recommends, usually based on number of drippers if I'm remembering correctly from when we set them up for our fruit trees.

article links

I wrote an article on using polymer crystals in 2008, and I still swear by them. http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1092/

For much cheaper moisture crystals, go to http://www.water-sorb.com/store.php?crn=209
Including shipping, their current price for 2 pounds of MEDIUM crystals is $19.95. 2 pounds of the medium crystals will last most gardeners a couple of seasons, and the price at Watersorb is much more reasonable than buying "Soil Moist" (TM) or any of the other branded products at your local store.

Medium is the size you want for most garden applications... the small ones can be nice for seed starting, large for when you're planting out trees, and I use powdered to make a slurry for when I'm mailing plants or planting bare root stuff. Medium is also the size to use for making "cool ties" -- very nice in the heat of summer! If you end up ordering a mix of sizes, call them, and they'll probably be able to give you a break on the price by combining shipping.

I also wrote a "Seed Starting 101" series for DG. At the bottom of the first article, you'll find links to others in the series. http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/464/ If you're growing basil, lobelia, or anything that grows in a clump-ish fashion, be sure to check out the clump transplanting method I learned from Tom DeBaggio: http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/862/

And I wrote a couple of articles on Winter Sowing, starting with http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/585/

Please pardon all the links -- this isn't shameless self-promotion; it's easier than trying to repeat the same info in these posts. I got paid once for the articles, but I don't get anything for people clicking on them now other than the enjoyment of teaching what I've learned about seed starting. :-)
Circles of Support for Breast Cancer
I'm learning to dance in the rain! Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
[Last edited Jan 23, 2015 7:48 AM CST]
Quote | Post #1115991 (20)

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