Cottage Gardening forum: Spring is arriving!!

 
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Imagejoseph
May 5, 2015 10:58 AM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity

I've got the main crop of tomatoes potted up:

Thumb of 2015-05-05/joseph/2f749a
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
ImageSorellina
May 5, 2015 3:54 PM CST
Name: Julianna
Victoria, BC USDA Zone 8
Ciao all-

I got all of Rick Corey's Asian brassicas (Red-Streaked Mizuna, Red Violet Tatsoi, Mei Qing Pac Choi, Joi Choi, Komatsuna, and Mibuna) transplanted today along with Early Purple Vienna Kohlrabi in the Asian Brassica bed. In the Lettuce/Salad bed, I transplanted Hungarian Winter Lettuce, Outredgeous Red Romaine, Gold Heart Curly Endive, and Bloomsdale Spinach. The seedlings are super small, much smaller than in previous years when I've started these things inside. I'm hoping that by having winter-sowed them, I will avoid early bolting. We have hot weather forecast for Friday, so I'm hoping that by transplanting them now on an overcast day, they will have a few days to settle in. I do plan to water often throughout the day on Friday. I also have extra seedlings in case of disaster.

Part of the reason for transplanting now is that I'm running out of space and other things do need potting up before I get around to transplanting them. I'm not sure when I should do anything about the vermiculite containers. Vermiculite on its own has no nutrition and I do have several things now that have sprouted, but they are SUPER tiny - big bread poppies, portulaca, snapdragon, really really tiny things.

I'm going to transplant some of the beets and chard tomorrow so that frees up 2 shelves in the greenhouse for the tomatoes that will need to come outside and start hardening off this weekend. I can probably bring out the 4 O'Clocks and nasturtiums as well if there's enough space.
Grazie a tutti,
Julianna
ImageRickCorey
May 5, 2015 6:44 PM CST
Name: Rick Corey
Pacific NorthWet Zone 8a
Applause! I'm envious.

Imagewildflowers
May 6, 2015 6:03 AM CST
Name: Christine
Northeast Texas, Zone 7b
Oh boy, it looks like the crops and gardens are coming along wonderfully!! Hurray!

And, speaking of 'wishlists' someone had Shepherd's Purse on their wishlist last year -- I have collected some seeds.

Also, awhile back someone was asking about Mulberry trees, I don't remember who it was. We have a little sapling that will need to be pulled up so speak up if you are interested. It's Morus rubra.
FAITH over fear!

poisondartfrog
May 6, 2015 5:16 PM CST
Name: Alana
Kentucky
The lettuces I got from RickCorey have done very well in spite of the extremes of hot and cold here. Little Gem has been just that.
Sorellina, have you seen this heirloom Nasturtium (Tropaeolum minus)Elf's Cap? This is the first year I have seen it and I am enjoying it very much, not so much the color, but the long spurred form.
Thumb of 2015-05-06/poisondartfrog/f24eab
ImageSorellina
May 7, 2015 7:02 AM CST
Name: Julianna
Victoria, BC USDA Zone 8
Ciao Alana-

I've been after the really rare nasturtiums for a while now. One I really like is the Phoenix Nasturtium, but like you, I'm not a fan of the hot colour scheme. Hopefully, someone out there with an eye to plant breeding can isolate the cream with red spots. I'm growing Yeti, a pale cream climber this year for our big obelisk, Lady Cream Purple Spot for the back tomato beds, and Empress of India for the half barrel planters. I was pleased that I got decent germination for the LCPS for once. I'm really hoping it sets a lot of seed for me so I can share.

It looks like I will have the number of Star of David Okra for my needs. I'm also hoping to save seed from this variety as it's been on my wish list forever and I used all of the seeds I did manage to get.

Today is weeding just in the morning. It's going to get quite warm. I think tomorrow will be an inside day. I've got to get a handle on the gardening "dishes" I still have yet to finish - tons of cups, inserts, larger pots, trays... Whistling
Grazie a tutti,
Julianna
Imagewildflowers
May 7, 2015 9:55 AM CST
Name: Christine
Northeast Texas, Zone 7b
Pretty naturtium, Alana! I like the long spurs.

I'm growing Yeti this year as well. It's not trailing like I was hoping but I like the pail yellow flowers.

Star of David okra is pretty. I haven't grown that one. Whistling My okra is in the ground. JuliesAcre's NOID had very good germination. Joseph, I got two sprouts only... I don't remember how many seeds but I planted all of them, I think it was eight seeds.

FAITH over fear!

ImageRickCorey
May 7, 2015 11:54 AM CST
Name: Rick Corey
Pacific NorthWet Zone 8a
Julianna,

If seed collecting doesn't work, Baker Creek has Star of David Okra, 30-75 seeds for $2.50.

http://www.rareseeds.com/star-of-david-okra/

I'm super-glad that you're growing more Brassicas than I have room or time for!
Imagejoseph
May 8, 2015 9:20 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
I currently have pak/bok choi flowering in my garden... They hardly formed any leaves, just bolted straight to seed. This first year, the only selection criteria is survival-of-the-fittest: It must produce seeds in my garden. Once I have an abundance of seed to play with, then I can start selecting for slow-bolting or larger plants. There are other plants growing that are making nice leaves. There are big differences in how well the various plants are dealing with the flea beetles.

Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited May 8, 2015 10:57 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1138626 (9)
ImageSorellina
May 9, 2015 9:46 AM CST
Name: Julianna
Victoria, BC USDA Zone 8
Joseph -

What I've been reading about Asian brassicas is that unless the variety specifically states that it's slow-bolting, bolting that happens with them is counter-intuitive to other plants - it's cold rather than heat that can bring that on. I'm growing some of the more cold-tolerant varieties this season.
Grazie a tutti,
Julianna
ImageAndi
May 9, 2015 10:54 AM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
What a nice greenhouse, Julianna. You must be excited!

Rick, thank you so much for the oriental veggies. They late winter/early spring sowed well. I have lots of sprouts, even radishes. I have had trouble getting radishes to germinate before. They aren't big enough to bolt, yet. I am looking forward to eating fresh greens.

I started extra tobacco, squash and a couple other seeds for my neighbor, Joe. He was so happy to get the potted seeds/seedlings. He asked if I got "ALL THOSE SEEDS" from the swap. I said mostly but I bought some too. He was teasing me about having "drug paraphernalia" aka those little bags. I better hide the poppy seeds in case I get raided , LOL.

It might rain today. It is one of those damp. dark, overcast, "maybe it wiill rain" days we get around here. At least it is a bit cooler today. It seems like just last week, I was complaining about the snow.

Winston the pug is enjoying the warm weather and our outside gardening time. He likes snoozing on the front step and barking at cars that pass the house. Some people slow down, point and laugh at the silly dog. One neighbor asked if he was senile, I said, no, he was always a bit nutty. Good thing he is so cute!
My hummingbird friend is entertaining me. He loves the new feeder. I got it at Walmart. It is easy to clean and has little perches for the hummingbird to rest - he doesn't rest. I love the little fellows. Hope they like some of the plants I started when they finally flower. I am trying to get a picture, but the little guy isn't used to me, yet. I got my neighbor the same feeder for his birthday. I am also looking for a starter rose - a double red knockout-but I haven't found a good one in the stores, yet. They are just starting to stock roses and other plants around here.

I have gardening dishes to do today also, Julianna. I have been leaving the dishes in the sink and hurrying out to garden. By the time it is dark, I am tired and leave them in the sink for later. Today is a cleaning and cooking day.
Imagejoseph
May 9, 2015 5:03 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
Sorellina wrote:What I've been reading about Asian brassicas is that unless the variety specifically states that it's slow-bolting, bolting that happens with them is counter-intuitive to other plants - it's cold rather than heat that can bring that on. I'm growing some of the more cold-tolerant varieties this season.


Thanks for that... I'll be sure and plant some warm weather seed as well.

Last time I successfully planted bok choi it must have been a variety that was insensitive to cold, because it grew huge in the coldest weather of my season, and didn't bolt until the weather turned hot.

I remember a year at the farmer's market that I call "The year without a carrot". Because it got unseasonably cold one night, around 17F after the carrots were already growing. Every carrot in the valley immediately bolted.


Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
Weedwhacker
May 9, 2015 7:24 PM CST
Name: Sandy B.
Michigan UP (Zone 4b or 5a)
Andi, LOL about the baggies and poppy seeds... and then there is also the heat emanating from our roof due to the fluorescent light Blinking Rolling on the floor laughing (not to even mention the catnip stash in our freezer, kept there because the cats clawed the heck out of my desk when I left it in a desk drawer)

Joseph, that's interesting about the carrots -- I didn't know they would bolt under those conditions; or maybe I should say, oh yeah, that's why I always wait until much later to get mine planted Whistling
"I am still learning"~~ Michelangelo
National Gardening Association
ImageAndi
May 10, 2015 8:20 AM CST
Name: aka GardenQuilts
Facebook, NGA
and the beloved Winston the pug
The first seeds for the next piggy swap are ripening! Pink amaryllis!
The new sprouts have lots of growing to do before they set seed!

Do you have suggestions for perennial plants for hanging baskets? They can be either perennials that survive a zone 6 winter, tender perennials perennials like begonia that can survive inside or tender perennials like dahlias and geraniums that can be stored dormant over the winter. Joe asked me for suggestions for his patio. He is tired of buying annuals every year. I told him I have some things starting, but they are still small.

Home Depot has a beautiful display of blue lobelia with red/white pinwheel petunias. I loved the blue, but would combine it with pale yellow petunias instead! I have started lobelia from seed before. It had a slow start and melted with the hot summer temperatures. I am trying again.

It is "almost raining" for the second day. The weather is overcast, humid, feeling like it could rain any minute - but doesn't rain for days! I wish it would dump the rain and get it over with like it does in Florida and the Carribean. At least it s cooler today. I was tempted to turn on the a/c yesterday. Winston was panting, so I set up a fan for him. The little fellow loves his creature comforts!
Imagepmb2005
May 11, 2015 10:40 AM CST
Name: Promise
Zone 7a Tennessee
Alana you always have the most interesting plants! This is my first year growing Nasturium. I have Indian Empress and Mixed Jewel. I managed to start True Lavender from seed. I'm excited about that. My Joe Pye Weed bit the dust and I am sad about that. I picked a bad place to plant it. Learning so much all the time. By the size of our garden I must be doing something right.

To my pleasant surprise I have milkweeds galore this year.

Asian greens, I planted the Stir Fry Mix from Renee's Garden and it bolted right away to. Glad to know why.

For Mother's Day we revamped the garden the cows trampled. Didn't have great germination on our corn so we went back in and replanted. Our Blue Hubbard squash is acting like its in a race. Those suckers are huge seedlings!

Now all we have left to plant is Melons and Pumpkins. Knoxville plant swap is this Saturday. Hope I can get some goodies there!

Happy Gardening all! Please send us some rain!
Promise
Imagejoseph
May 12, 2015 7:58 PM CST
Name: Joseph
Cache Valley Great Basin
Landrace: locally-adapted diversity
I planted okra today in pots in the greenhouse: 16 seeds per pot. I ended up with 30 different varieties, including seeds from the hoggy swap, and a generous donation from Southern Seed Exchange. I planted about 6 pots fruit-to-row from mother plants that I really liked. And a pot of anything else that produced fruit in my garden. I planted seeds from two other gardeners that were grown locally, but in slightly warmer micro-climates than my garden. Thanks everyone for the seeds!

Whoever didn't get your 4 O'clock seeds, I found them mixed in with the okra...
Author of Mother Earth News Blog about Landrace Gardening: http://www.motherearthnews.com/search.aspx?tags= Lofthouse
[Last edited May 12, 2015 10:13 PM CST]
Quote | Post #1139429 (16)
SCbuttercup
May 13, 2015 3:33 AM CST
Name: Judy
Simpsonville , SC
Promise, hope you get your rain soon. Here in my part of South Carolina it was getting dry and hot so I was so excited to wake up yesterday to a lush wet world. Alleluia there was a huge overnight thunder and lightning drenching followed by a warm intensely sunny day. I swear the pole beans grew a foot yesterday, I was out in the dark tying them up. Has anyone heard that lightning supercharged the rain with nitrogen? Or was it some other element? Anyways it had an almost magical effect and in one day the growth is astonishing. Hope everyone gets their share of some refreshing rain.
ImageRedLeopard
May 13, 2015 6:18 AM CST
Name: Ron
Naples, FL
I have read that the reason rain lilies respond to rain and not to water from the garden hose is the ozone brought down by the rain. It's been so long I don't remember if that was established fact or speculation.

ImageRedLeopard
May 13, 2015 6:30 AM CST
Name: Ron
Naples, FL
And a quick Google of "lightning nitrogen" brings up multiple references "fixed nitrogen" useable by plants for growth is formed by three processes: microbes (as with legumes), lightning, and by some intentional industrial processes.

So, Judy, looks like you were remembering correctly! Thumbs up
Imagewildflowers
May 13, 2015 8:32 AM CST
Name: Christine
Northeast Texas, Zone 7b
Rain and other moving water has negative ions, which are very good for people so may also be good for plant life. Let it rain!! Hurray!
FAITH over fear!

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