Article: Myth #2: All Perennials Require little or No Maintenance.: Thanks for the information and reminders

 
Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

Views: 9, Replies: 20 » Jump to the end
Image Myth #2: All Perennials Require little or No Maintenance.
By Charlie Street on November 4, 2010

The second popular myth (see previous article for the first) associated with perennials assumes that, once planted, perennials maintain themselves. It may be true that some perennials do only require minimal maintenance, but many others require a lot. In addition, when perennials are placed in large beds in the company of many other perennials, maintenance is complicated and time consuming.

» Read the article

ImageTwinLakesChef
Nov 4, 2010 6:05 PM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
We are currently digging and separating perennials . . iris . . daylilies . . lilies. It was time to do this; the garden was getting too full. We cut down a tree and cleared out plants as I plan to grow tomoatoes in that area next year. A lot of work but necessary.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
ImagePollyK
Nov 4, 2010 9:04 PM CST
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY

It is a lot of work, but well worth it. A great article, Charlie! I'm sure it will help people to plan their perennial beds well. Read all info they can on the plants, before placement. A perennial bed that works is a wondrous thing.
SunnyBorders
Nov 4, 2010 9:09 PM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Know what you mean, about 'the garden getting too full', Arlene.

We cleared spots for vegetables but just planted more perennials instead. Lack of discipline!
SunnyBorders
Nov 4, 2010 9:38 PM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Thanks, Polly.

Agree, of course, with your advice about the need for info. Mind you, when it comes to perennials, I frequently find that I still don't have enough. But then there's always falling back (as quickly as possible) on learning from ones mistakes!

A 'perennial bed that works' really is a challenge. But both the gardening and the results have their own rewards.
ImageTwinLakesChef
Nov 4, 2010 9:38 PM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
I love pretty flowers but love tomatoes more.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
SunnyBorders
Nov 4, 2010 9:43 PM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Wouldn't say a word against tomatoes. Arlene!

Spouse and I love them.
ImageTwinLakesChef
Nov 4, 2010 9:49 PM CST
Name: Arlene Marshall
Twin Lakes, IA & Orange, CA
Zone 4B
Sunny,
They are one of my many passions but they make me Grumbling

We are totally at the whims of Mother Nature and this year was the worst. During the summer . . I eat BLT's for breakfast.
Yum Yum Divas ~ ~ "Most recipes are not invention . . . but evolutions"
ImageSharon
Nov 4, 2010 11:43 PM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
What a wonderfully informative article, Charlie. I don't think I've ever seen it spelled out quite as clearly as you have done here.

Perennial gardening is my favorite, though with our drought this summer it nearly did me in. I finally have it under control now, I think, so I'm looking forward to seeing what survived in the spring. I'll bet I didn't lose much, but I sure wish the drought had wiped out the weeds.

Thank you so much!
ImageLance
Nov 5, 2010 7:51 AM CST
Name: Lance Gardner
coastal plain Virginia
Question authority, guide in wisdom
I have many perennials growing in the veggie garden. I like the color and variety, and the flowers attract lots of beneficial insects. The veggie garden also happens to be the only place I seem to be able to keep up with, as I also enjoy the fresh produce, so I ensure it is well tended Smiling . The other gardens are suffering until I can find the opportunity to work on them diligently again - maybe when I retire? Or when my son deems it worthwhile?
Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground -- the unborn of the future Nation. The Constitution of the Iroquois Nations.
Dogs; Family Fun Unplugged; Perennials, Annuals, Veggies; Happy Birthday Wishes
SunnyBorders
Nov 5, 2010 9:41 AM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Thank you Sharon. Following your example, I've tried to write not just from available information, but also from experience.

As you indicate, perennial gardening is not just planning ahead (not inherently my personal forte anyway), but it's also reacting to circumstances beyond the gardener's control. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for your (and my) weather next year!

Lance, my sister, Tilly, and I always helped our Mum in her garden. We never minded doing it because we liked her so much, but I think it took another forty years before we actually felt that working in the garden was really 'worthwhile'.





ImagePollyK
Nov 5, 2010 9:45 AM CST
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY

I'm not a writer, Charlie, but I do so admire Sharons writings. I just have to say writing from experience is the only way to go. Available information is, well, available. I don't wish to read anything someone has just picked up off the internet, as I can go read it on the internet just as well.

Your article was informative, from experience, and well written. I look forward to more.
ImageSharon
Nov 5, 2010 9:49 AM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
Polly,
Writers need inspiration, and I do so admire that you are often my inspiration.
Thank you.

And thanks again, Charlie, you inspire me, too.
Most often you inspire me to get out there and mangle those weeds!
ImagePollyK
Nov 5, 2010 10:01 AM CST
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY

Thank you, Sharon.

Charlie, I was just posting pictures of one of my borders from late summer. After your article I took a closer look at it. Number one, I realized it needed weeding, and number 2, I definitely have to divide. Those poor things are way crammed in there.

Thumb of 2010-11-05/PollyK/4aaf1e
SunnyBorders
Nov 5, 2010 11:16 AM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Polly, totally agree re Sharon's writing. It's clever to be clever, but it's even more clever to also be productive. Sharon's always very complimentary to everyone else, but her productivity (and creativity) (over 600 articles) is truly amazing.

Sharon, if my arm would reach to Kentucky, I'd be proud to pull up some of those weeds!

Polly, even though you talk about it being time to intervene in that grass border of yours, it really is extremely pretty. It's always very enlightening to be able to see how other gardeners put plants together in a perennial bed.
ImageSharon
Nov 5, 2010 5:50 PM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
Thank you Charlie. If you could reach to KY, I'd pull you on in and keep you here for awhile.

Polly, that border grabs me every time I see it. I really love the way you use grasses. It's beautiful.
ImagePollyK
Nov 5, 2010 6:42 PM CST
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY

Thank you Sharon.

And after you're done with Charlie, please pass him on up.
ImageSharon
Nov 5, 2010 6:49 PM CST
Name: Sharon
Kentucky
Well, maybe...
SunnyBorders
Nov 5, 2010 7:11 PM CST
Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5a
Sharon and Polly, you're both very supportive. I really appreciate it.

I tend to feel that when the going gets tough, the tough get going. But nothing's so tough when there's (Blue Garden) friends around.
ImageLance
Nov 6, 2010 7:32 AM CST
Name: Lance Gardner
coastal plain Virginia
Question authority, guide in wisdom
I like full gardens, Polly, so I would say leave it like it is (except for the weeds).
The benefits and detriments of computer friends - we meet many wonderful people, but why do they have to be so far away?
Possible freeze tonight, the first one, so I may need to do a bit of garden saving today, if I can get to it. I need to at least figure out where to put the houseplants.
Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground -- the unborn of the future Nation. The Constitution of the Iroquois Nations.
Dogs; Family Fun Unplugged; Perennials, Annuals, Veggies; Happy Birthday Wishes
ImagePollyK
Nov 6, 2010 8:15 AM CST
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY

Thanks Lance. Unfortunately I can't leave it like it is. I do like the look, but crowded plants are not happy plants, and survival of the fittest will occur. So, I will divide. I'm sure in five years, left alone, it would be a bed of monarda and trees. Luckily there are always people to take the divisions. No plants to the compost here, other than dead annuals. Which I don't do many of.

I am supportive, Charlie, but I also do admire your wisdom in gardening.

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

« Back to the top
« Cubits.org homepage
« Perennials, Annuals & Veggies: Tips, Tricks & Pix cubit homepage
« Article: Myth #2: All Perennials Require little or No Maintenance.

You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Perennials, Annuals & Veggies: Tips, Tricks & Pix

This cubit is so we can share gardening tips, tricks, ideas, and methods, and talk about what works and does not work. Of course, what works for one person may not work for another, so let’s share why methods may or may not work, as well.

» Home
» Forums
» Articles

Cubit owner: Lance

Admin team:

Moderator of the perennial forum: Charlie (SunnyBorders)