Roulades - Fancy term for Food Fun

By Dea O'Hopp (Dea) on April 20, 2010

It's just a fancy word for rolling your food. How many of us remember our Mom's stuffed flank steak or the traditional pumpkin roll? Here's a reminder that you can take a tough and lean piece of meat with very little effort and turn it into something special that your family or guests will love. You'll also have a ton of fun and can let your imagination go wild !

First, thanks Kat for allowing me to write some articles in your cubit!  I know my layout isn't perfect, but the food is :)

When I was growing up, there were 9 kidlets at home, so my Mom stretched the food budget in amazing ways.  A favorite was always stuffed flank steak.  I loved that stuff.  She filled it with whatever was left over in the frig and I've continued to make it my own way.  Dad still at 86, says he wants his meat "grey" - but it's pretty funny that he doesn't turn his nose up at our medium rare dishes :)  On to the fancy term of roulade.

A roulade in French means to roll, or in cooking terms per Merriam-Webster -  a slice of usually stuffed meat that is rolled, browned, and steamed or braised.  Ok, so that's why my Mom browned it and then put it in the oven for umpteen hours til it was "grey"; or maybe it's that there were 9 kids needing attention?  Probably the latter!   Anyhow - here's how I roll:

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Flank steak was on sale. I sliced it cross hatch ways so it would be easier to roll and threw on some dried herbs of thyme, rosemary and oregano.  Put that in the frig to marinate early in the morning - easy peezee - no work! 2010-04-19/Dea/67051d Sunday afternoon I pulled that steak out and scrounged the frig.  It was cold yesterday and knew there was no way I was going to grill this; so a roulade was the answer.  I had some frozen spinach that I ran under cold water to defrost and then squeezed dry.  Lay it across the steak that's been in the frig.

 

2010-04-19/Dea/fdd92e You could use any cheese you like, but there was some nice blue stuff - I love blue cheese - so that got crumbled on top of the spinach.  Now some folks love feta, but it's so salty; blue just works better for me.  Your choice.

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I need some color and have no red peppers yet, but I still have some diced canned tomatoes so those are next up.

 

2010-04-19/Dea/dfa13c Why have I kept all this on a piece of saran wrap?  Here's why - this thing needs to get rolled up and I need help - no sous chef that I can find.  The dogs are highly trained, but this is above and beyond their abilities :)

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Do you know how to do the butcher's tie?  It's a great skill to have and very simple; although I think I might have muffed it this time! Oh Well!

 Turn your oven to 375 degrees while you finish up, ok?  If you want your meat super well done, then do it at 325 degrees and just cook it longer.

In a skillet or griddle pan - my griddle pan was clean so that's what I used - turn it to high and using tongs, sear the top and bottom of this roll.  That way, it seals both ends so your spinach and cheese won't come out.

Now, sear the entire roll - you just have to roll it around in the pan on all sides till it gets nice and brown.  At this time, you are beginning to realize what this thing is going to turn into and taste like.  And it's a very good feeling.2010-04-19/Dea/ae4378

Pop your roulade into the 375 oven for 30 minutes or longer and at the lower temperature if you want your beef well done.

While it's cooking, take that pan that you seared the meat in and throw in whatever it is you like - I used 1/4 c. of dry red wine and 1/4 c. of water.  Simmered on the stove, it made the perfect au jus to serve over the dish.  I also threw in the rested meat juices.  When you remove your roll from the oven at your desired doneness, please let it rest for at least 15 minutes before you slice and serve.Your patience will be rewarded.  I promise!  The result tasted delicious and yes, I cheated with frozen mixed vegetables, garden isn't producing yet - yet I say :)   

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You can roulade any tough piece of meat - the possibilities are endless.  Just have fun with your cooking and let your family and friends think you're a genius.  Thanks for reading and hoping you all have fun creating your own roulades! 

 

Related articles:
Flank steak, Fun with Food, Roulade

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Comments and discussion:
Subject Thread Starter Last Reply Replies
Wonderful! threegardeners Jun 11, 2010 3:09 PM 16

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