Health-related aspects forum: Health benefits? Yes, there are benefits!

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Imagezuzu
Jun 12, 2010 3:35 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
I've just done a cursory scan of the Web and I hope the rest of you can add more.

Here's what I've found so far:

Smoking retards or prevents ADHD, Parkinson's, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's.

Even in families with a predisposition to Alzheimer's, in which every single family member ultimately suffered from it, the onset in the smoking family members came at least 4 years later than in the non-smoking family members.

There's also the biggie: I can still fit into the tennis dress I wore in high school. My non-smoking and ex-smoker friends weigh far more than they did 50 years ago.

Despite the title of this thread, I have to admit that I was diagnosed with emphysema three years ago. In spite of that, I have way more energy and stamina than the non-smokers and former smokers of my age I know.
Imageflaflwrgrl
Dec 25, 2011 6:31 PM CST
Name: Ann
North Central Fl
Okay, totally unscientific here but:

I quit doing any kind of drugs ohhhhhh 35 or so years ago

I eat well & proper, not hardly any junk food at all. Home cooked meals for the most part & even snacks are more healthy than the average American eats.

Don't drink any sodas, diet or otherwise.

Cut out a WHOLE LOT of fat from the diet.

Hardly ever drink but trying hard to learn to. Hilarious!

Don't lie, cheat or steal.

Menopause, at least for now, has killed my sex drive deader than a door nail.

Now, I find I have celiac disease & must follow a strict gluten free diet. And when you research just exactly what that means then you will bypass 90% of what they sell in the stores which is labeled "gluten free" because unless it's also processed in a gluten free facility then you don't dare eat it because of cross contamination issues. When 1/8 tsp. of flour can gluten a celiac then you take cross contamination issues VERY seriously!

What's left to me? Except cursing & smoking? You have to relieve the stress somehow!

I truly believe smoking is actually GOOD for my health in that respect. Take away smoking & what's left? A bullet.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."
Will Rogers
Imagezuzu
Dec 25, 2011 8:27 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
It's funny that you say you're learning how to drink. I'm thinking of doing the same thing. I've been working at night for almost 40 years, and I've always envied people who could have a drink and relax after dinner. I could never do that because I had to keep my mind sharp for that night's work. Now my contract has been slashed so severely that I'm virtually retired as of January. I think I'll take up drinking. Big Grin

Now, down to the more serious stuff. Do you have a firm diagnosis of celiac disease? The reason I ask is that it's become the latest "fashionable" ailment. Are you old enough to remember when everyone who was anyone suddenly began suffering from hypoglycemia in the late 1970s? It was the disease to have at that time, and the treatment for it was harmless and even beneficial. People started carrying around cubes of Laughing Cow cheese or some other type of protein and eating them every two hours, which actually is a good way for anyone to eat.

Now everyone's suddenly climbing on the gluten-free bandwagon, but that diet actually has some undesirable side-effects and is much more difficult to maintain, so I would want a firm and reliable diagnosis before I resorted to that. Celiac disease is quite rare in smokers.
Imageflaflwrgrl
Dec 25, 2011 9:52 PM CST
Name: Ann
North Central Fl
Well Zuzu, I'm not on the gluten free bandwagon because it's trendy that's for sure! It's a royal pain in the arse as a matter of fact. But to answer your question straight out -- NO --- I don't have a diagnosis by a medical professional. I am self diagnosed. And here is why: I happen to have the celiac rash which it is estimated that 1/4 of celiacs have or will get. Now, the celiac rash is VERY distinctive, VERY. And I am textbook. Believe me, I wish it weren't so. I spent 2 years trying to figure out what these little tiny maddeningly itchy blisters were that were popping up on me. Only a few at a time at first. And then things progressed until this past April I had a monster breakout. Bilateral. When healed they leave a purplish scar (it fades in time). My belly looks like I got perfectly matching tattoos on either side, my lower back too. I researched in earnest & finally came across the celiac rash. I didn't stop there. I researched virtually every other skin condition which makes blisters & itches so bad you want to take a filet knife to your skin. Celiac rash is a perfect match & more to the point, NOTHING else comes close. Did you know that a perfectly performed biopsy by a dermatologist who really knows how to do a skin biopsy for dermatitis herpetiformis returns a 37% false negative? Most derms haven't even done a biopsy for it. When one has celiac which manifests in the skin rash then the normal tests for celiac generally turn up false negatives BECAUSE the immune system is attacking the skin more than the small intestine. Good news, bad news. With the rash there tends to be far less damage to the small intestine & the celiacs with the rash tend NOT to have the GI symptoms (or not as severe) as do celiacs who don't suffer the rash. I also tried antihistamines. It's not an allergic reaction to anything. The antihistamines don't make it go away.
I don't follow the news that much of late & really had no idea that the whole gluten free thing was such a fashionable thing these days. I was pretty clueless actually. I know dogs are allergic to wheat, corn & soy & especially the glutens but I had no idea humans were going gluten free so much.
Now understand that I'm not honking on you. I know that you are only concerned that I'm not going down a false road. And I appreciate that. But I am positive this is what it is and nothing else. And I will not try to pursue a diagnosis of the rash when it returns so many false negatives. Oh, & BTW, you have to gluten yourself for the celiac tests. Something I am not willing to do for anyone! EVER! I will not go backwards. It has been too hard getting to this point. The rash is getting better. Not gone yet but better, less severe. It also can jump on me big time at any point for at least 6 months after being totally gluten free.
There is a cure for celiac disease & therefore the celiac rash. No gluten. Period. You don't need pills. You just don't eat gluten.
I am eating so much more fresh fruits & vegetables & nuts than I ever did before. And I'm being cognizant to get enough B vitamins.
I would be very curious as to the source of the information about celiac disease being rare in smokers. I would like to read about that if you can lay your hands on the info.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."
Will Rogers
Imagezuzu
Dec 25, 2011 11:11 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Okay. I respect a well-informed self-diagnosis more than a trendy diagnosis from medical personnel. I was just worried about you because physicians seem to be blaming everything on gluten lately when they can't find another cause. You've done the research and you have real symptoms, so that's a firm and reliable diagnosis as far as I'm concerned.

Luckily, because of the gluten-free trend, it isn't as difficult to find the right foods anymore, and people are trading gluten-free recipes right and left on line. I'm glad to know that you know the B vitamins are essential, so keep up with those.

I don't remember where I read the info about celiac disease and smoking because I did so much research on this topic a couple of years ago and it all runs together in my head, but smokers have fewer GI problems in general (having a cigarette after meals relaxes your innards Smiling ), so that might be the reason you've escaped that part of the disease. The rash, however, sounds horrible and I can understand not wanting to go through it again just for the sake of a test that might prove inconclusive anyway. I hope the gluten-free diet keeps that away from you forever.
Imagezuzu
Dec 25, 2011 11:19 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
I just found this rather dated study that cautiously suggests smoking guards against celiac disease or at least postpones the onset of symptoms. It says more research is required to confirm those assumptions, and I have read later studies that do confirm them.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11280554?dopt=Abstract
Imageflaflwrgrl
Dec 26, 2011 3:06 PM CST
Name: Ann
North Central Fl
And here is a study that confirms it.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12923372

Thanks Zuzu for the link. It was from there that I found the one posted above.
Very interesting Zuzu. I might add that I am sure my mom had celiac with hers manifesting as the rash. Around her mid 50's she began to get the rash in her scalp. At the time who knew anything about what it might be? She just said it was from "nerves". It itched severely & my mother had a will of iron & yet was not able to restrain herself from scratching. I saw & felt the "bumps" as she called them. OMG! They were exactly what I have & I get them in my scalp also. In fact, that was about the third place they began to appear on me. At the time I thought, "like mother, like daughter" as we are very much alike. Mom's were not as severe as mine are & she never got the rash anywhere else on her body.
If it were not for the rash & it being a textbook version then I would still be doubting what I have. I both curse & celebrate the rash as I'm sure you can imagine the reasons why.
I've had very little GI symptoms except for one biggie. Bloat so bad it was as if l were 14 months pregnant. It would wake me in the night & I had to roll out of bed as I was so bloated I could not bend at the waist. Walk for hours like a horse with colic. There were 3 occasions I came inches from calling 911 because I though it was going to kill me. Fall of 2010 I had my first colonoscopy & I told the Gastro about this. He passed it off as "well, what people eat these days", I then told him how I ate & so he then blamed it possibly on menopause. I underwent a whole rank & file of medical tests last year as I was overdue for all that stuff. I had an U/S which turned up a fatty liver (typical of celiacs) & that was shluffed off by the Gastro also. Hmmmmm......

Hey, maybe we can learn to drink together! Hilarious! Virtual drinking buddies. Rolling on the floor laughing Absolutely must be wine though. Beer is a no-no. Now I know why I never did like the stuff in the first place. Always upset my stomach.

I'm so sorry to hear about the severe slash in your contract. Are you going to make it okay? I guess you could always go back to teaching. Blinking
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."
Will Rogers
Imagezuzu
Dec 26, 2011 8:38 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
So, there we are! You've found another of the confirmed health benefits of smoking. Smiling

I actually can't go back to teaching without buying a car, and if I could afford a car, I wouldn't need another job. It's a vicious circle. Besides, universities have the same budget constraints as the government, so I doubt that anyone's looking for a professor of comparative literature. It's more likely that the California colleges are eliminating whole departments instead of just reducing the faculty. Even when times were better, we constantly had to "justify the existence" of the comp lit department.

On the bright side, I'm old enough to collect social security, so the combination of that and my small contract will keep me afloat.

I've never liked beer, except half and half with 7-up in summer, what the Brits call "lager and lime." It's a nice cooling summer drink. Red wine makes me break out in large red blotches on my face, unfortunately, and most of the white wines taste like a rubber band, so I'll probably indulge in Margaritas instead. I like tequila-based drinks.
Imageflaflwrgrl
Dec 26, 2011 9:17 PM CST
Name: Ann
North Central Fl
Okay, so that works. You can do the social security & your small contract & slow down & smell the roses for a while. Things have to improve at some point & you will pick up another small contract somewhere.

Someone who would know once told me you have to find your liquor. That one which doesn't make you feel drunk but instead gives you a high feeling. I actually experimented around for a while & did find that to be true. I discovered that my liquor is Vodka. None of that sloppy, slobbery, muddy feeling. Just a nice clean high type of effect. Apparently yours is Tequila. Big Grin
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."
Will Rogers
roseseek
Jul 9, 2013 12:05 AM CST
Flaflwrgirl, check out Atopic Dermatitis. It is very much "allergic skin", asthma of the skin, dermal fybromyalgia. It is called "the itch that rashes". I call it, "Hives for the hell of it". I went through months of progressively worsening rashes all over my body, terminating in everything from my upper lip to my feet broken out. The ONLY thing that provided relief was to scald my rashes with as hot water as I could physically stand. Itching is low level pain. Pushing that low level over into searing pain stopped it dead. Of course, it dried out the skin, making the itch worse once the trauma of burning it out wore off, but I could SLEEP, which nothing else permitted me to do. I was on high dose prednisone three times in four months until I demanded, "NO MORE!", but it was the ONLY thing that made the rash go away...at least for a few days. It made me crazy and actually homicidal. On it, I would rather spit at you than talk to anyone. Hateful.

Atopic dermatitis occurs in "allergic family". If there are cases of asthma in your family (including you); if there are cases of fybromyalgia (including you);' if there are cases of severe allergies, including food, in your family (including you); and if there are no other causes for your rashes, it could well be Atopic Dermatitis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atopic_dermatitis

The skin has histamine cells which cause the itching reaction to allergens and other triggers. In AD sufferers, those cells leak, causing itching for no discernable reason, hence the name "atopic", or without cause. Taking cool baths, drying gently fully and slathering on a good moisturizer religiously can help. Wear only cotton clothing, nothing synthetic and wear loose fitting clothes. Stay cool, though entering an overly air conditioned, very cold building not only causes me to break into a sneezing fit, severe runny nose and rashing, as being overly hot and sweaty will rash me up. Get plenty of sleep and stay very well hydrated. It is possible anti histamines might help you, they haven't me.

Diagnosing AD requires testing you for EVERYTHING else possible, including hepatitis C and lymphoma, diabetes, high cholesterol and all other conditions and diseases which cause or can cause rashes. If NOTHING else is found, you have AD. Fun stuff. At least now I know what it is and what some of the things I can do to ward off issues with it. Until I knew why, I would break out at the drop of a hat and it would intensify to the point of Urgent Care visits. Now, I have been able to handle all it's thrown at me for the past several years.
Imagezuzu
Jul 9, 2013 2:53 AM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
What a terrifying condition! My few brief bouts with poison oak, which would spread to every inch of my body, made me feel homicidal, so I can understand your feelings. Poison oak, however, clears up quickly. I can't imagine having to live with that problem permanently.

Your mention of family allergies reminded me of something from my childhood. I'm allergic to my own hair. As long as it's growing on my head, it doesn't pose any problem, but if a hair falls out and gets lodged inside my clothing, I get fierce hives almost immediately. I always have to turn my clothes inside out and inspect them carefully before I put them on, just in case a hair made its way into my clothing while it was in the washer or dryer. I discovered this peculiarity when I was quite young and mentioned it to my older sister, who informed me that everyone has that allergy! Years later, I learned that it was only everyone in my family, not everyone in the world. Big Grin
roseseek
Jul 9, 2013 9:10 AM CST
Interesting! I know a number of people who are "allergic" to their own perspiration. My best friend must change his boxers and shirts frequently, whether he showers or not. Wearing them more than a few hours results in breaking out in places no one wants to be seen scratching. It isn't a function of detergents, soaps or personal grooming products. Changing everything has resulted in no variation in his bodily responses. I'm honestly wondering if there is a connection between such allergies and the inability to give up tobacco. I quite for nine and a half months of INSANITY. It's pretty bad when your mother buys you a carton, shoves them in your face and demands, "SMOKE the ()*&_(*_( things!" Hypnosis won't work, I can't be hypnotized. I've wasted enough money in that direction. Acupuncture doesn't work. Wasted too much money in that direction, too. Patches, gum and Zyban weren't effective. It isn't that I don't WANT to quit, believe me.
Imagezuzu
Jul 9, 2013 1:01 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Patches would almost certainly cause dermatitis in anyone prone to allergic reactions. I don't know whether there's a connection between allergies and the inability to quit. I think it might be simpler than that: If you've been smoking for a long time, it's impossible to quit and remain the same person you've always been. Some people turn into irritable (and irritating!) individuals and others sink into depression. The last time I tried to quit, which was more than 10 years ago, I withdrew deep into myself and couldn't communicate with anyone. My thoughts were consumed with various ways of committing suicide. My friends and neighbors, all of whom had advised me to quit, were begging me to start smoking again and cheered loudly when I did.
roseseek
Jul 9, 2013 2:40 PM CST
I COMPLETELY understand! Nicotine is a neural stimulator. It literally "picks you up". Zyban supposedly works to help alleviate the cravings by raising your blood pressure. That rise in blood pressure is also what elevates your mood and helps improve depression. Too low blood pressure creates depression, which is why many of the blood pressure medications result in depression. The newer smoking cessation medications which block the Nicotine receptors may help ween you from the drug, but they will also leave you in a state of depression. The only "chemical" replacements are endorphins from exercise (runner's high), sex, risky behavors (adrenaline) and amphetamines. Those who quit cold turkey or who are tobacco free after hypnosis or acupuncture were NOT "chemically addicted". They had either the social or oral (or both) addictions, but were not self medicating to improve mood (reduce depression) by taking the Nicotine. Those who can't quit ARE chemically addicted and require more assistance than a few weeks of anti depressants and Nicotine replacement through other sources. The very few whom I have known who were chemically dependent and who have eliminated it from their lives have remained clinically depressed. Two have actually committed suicide.

Yes, I do believe the addictive personalities, allergies, etc. are connected genetically. They seem to follow autism, learning disabilities, bipolarity, depression, OCD behavior and a number of other conditions, including schizophrenia. All of which increase dramatically as IQ increases. The kids who used to be considered "slow" or "retarded" are often quite the opposite, extremely intelligent. Very often, they do lack the ability to put that intelligence into use. Think "idiot savants". My oldest friend and his wife have two children. Their daughter is brilliant and a voracious reader. She can argue law, politics and religion from any side you wish and convince you to agree with her position. She is highly functionally autistic with a very high dose of Asperger's. She hasn't the "common sense" to come in from the rain and will never be able to fully be independent. She is aware she is different from the "norm" and hates feeling different. Their son is brilliant, bipolar, with extreme learning disabilities. He learns best by watching, seeing something done. Once the information is presented to him the way his brain absorbs it, he is quickly expert in whatever the subject is. He has the classic irritability associated with the bipolarity and knows he is more highly intelligent than many with whom he comes in contact. Part of that is the "know it all youth", but MUCH of it IS, he honestly IS more intelligent. Less experienced, but possessing much greater inherent intelligence. Unfortunately, he is 20 and is smoking already. He complains he only "feels good" when he smokes and also experiences the severe cravings, "nicotine fits", when he needs a 'fix'. That family has epilepsy, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, depression/bipolarity, drug and alcohol addiction and atopic dermatitis in it, on both maternal and paternal sides. Classic. We "breed for it". Think Hollywood, Silicone Valley, Wall Street. Wherever great creativity exists, you find it. All of the symptoms are associated with increased creativity. The greater the creativity and intelligence, the more extreme the expressions of the "mental illnesses".
Imagezuzu
Jul 9, 2013 8:57 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
This is really interesting. I feel as if I'm on a therapist's couch. During that brief period while I was trying to quit, I called Kaiser and talked to an advice nurse, describing my feelings of depression and asking whether there was some nicotine delivery system I could use other than the patch. She then depressed me even more by telling me that if I had been living on an artificial nicotine high for all these years, there was no value in reproducing it. She said this was my true personality and I'd have to get used to it. In essence, she was telling me that I'd be miserable for the rest of my life. I thought she was an irresponsible moron to say those things to me, but now I see that she must have been telling me the truth. I've always joked that quitting would kill me a lot faster than smoking, but it probably isn't a joke.

People who know me well enough to have heard bits of my life story always ask how I can be so cheerful all of the time. In this context, it makes perfect sense that I would have begun self-medicating so young. I was 11 when I became completely hooked on cigarettes and I do remember that I started coping better with various problems at about that time..
roseseek
Jul 10, 2013 1:16 AM CST
Wow! That's rather early to be self medicating. Kind of scary, too. I didn't touch a cigarette until I was 18, but the first one was all it took. I wish to heavens I had never touched the first one, though who knows what today would have been like without the self medication? Yes, that nurse was giving you the 'tough love' routine. It's finding something to take the edge off not having the beneficial effects of the nicotine that is the trick. The nine and a half months I went cold turkey was one continuous, steadily increasing nicotine fit. I knew a gentleman years ago who quit cold turkey after smoking for over forty years. I knew him a good decade after quitting and he was miserable. He quit due to health reasons and nothing ever replaced the loss. He swore he craved a smoke as strongly ten years after quitting as he did the first day of being a non smoker. That is what scares me the most. I don't DO cravings.
Imagezuzu
Jul 10, 2013 3:16 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Yes! The beautiful thing about smoking is that it deters other cravings.

My mother quit smoking and died of lung cancer 40 years later. It's true that she put off the inevitable for a long time, but she wanted a cigarette every day of those 40 years. She said she only felt comfortable at night -- because she always smoked in her dreams. She would wake up feeling guilty but satisfied, until she'd realize she was now a non-smoker and then the craving would return.
Imageflaflwrgrl
Aug 1, 2013 9:06 PM CST
Name: Ann
North Central Fl
roseseek wrote:Flaflwrgirl, check out Atopic Dermatitis. It is very much "allergic skin", asthma of the skin, dermal fybromyalgia. It is called "the itch that rashes". I call it, "Hives for the hell of it". I went through months of progressively worsening rashes all over my body, terminating in everything from my upper lip to my feet broken out. The ONLY thing that provided relief was to scald my rashes with as hot water as I could physically stand. Itching is low level pain. Pushing that low level over into searing pain stopped it dead. Of course, it dried out the skin, making the itch worse once the trauma of burning it out wore off, but I could SLEEP, which nothing else permitted me to do. I was on high dose prednisone three times in four months until I demanded, "NO MORE!", but it was the ONLY thing that made the rash go away...at least for a few days. It made me crazy and actually homicidal. On it, I would rather spit at you than talk to anyone. Hateful.

Atopic dermatitis occurs in "allergic family". If there are cases of asthma in your family (including you); if there are cases of fybromyalgia (including you);' if there are cases of severe allergies, including food, in your family (including you); and if there are no other causes for your rashes, it could well be Atopic Dermatitis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atopic_dermatitis

The skin has histamine cells which cause the itching reaction to allergens and other triggers. In AD sufferers, those cells leak, causing itching for no discernable reason, hence the name "atopic", or without cause. Taking cool baths, drying gently fully and slathering on a good moisturizer religiously can help. Wear only cotton clothing, nothing synthetic and wear loose fitting clothes. Stay cool, though entering an overly air conditioned, very cold building not only causes me to break into a sneezing fit, severe runny nose and rashing, as being overly hot and sweaty will rash me up. Get plenty of sleep and stay very well hydrated. It is possible anti histamines might help you, they haven't me.

Diagnosing AD requires testing you for EVERYTHING else possible, including hepatitis C and lymphoma, diabetes, high cholesterol and all other conditions and diseases which cause or can cause rashes. If NOTHING else is found, you have AD. Fun stuff. At least now I know what it is and what some of the things I can do to ward off issues with it. Until I knew why, I would break out at the drop of a hat and it would intensify to the point of Urgent Care visits. Now, I have been able to handle all it's thrown at me for the past several years.


I'm sorry, somehow I lost this thread for a while & didn't know there were any new posts on it.
I truly appreciate your input but there's no doubt that it's dermatitis herpetiformis (dh) which is the skin presentation of celiac disease. It fits like a glove. You get small water filled blisters that itch & sting like a fire ant is biting you. Before you get the blisters, for 12 to 24 hrs prior the area will itch like mad but you look & there is nothing there --- zero, zip, zilch, nada. After the blisters break or you scratch them into breaking, it itches like nothing you've ever known in your life. It itches BONE DEEP. It gets even worse at night if it can get any worse than the torture you experience 24 hrs. a day. It keeps you from sleeping. It is called the suicidal itch & I know why. It presents bilaterally. It's ASTOUNDING how it does that. If you get it on your right forefinger you will get it matching on your left forefinger --- I'm talking about an EXACT match. Right knee, left knee. My husband & I were just looking at it & talking about that a few minutes ago. It has my legs from the knee down at present & both legs match. It is not however, on the calves. If you look at the back of my legs my calves are clear on both legs & on both legs everything else has the rash.
Gee, I could swear that somewhere you mentioned eating low histamine & the foods involved but I can't find that now. At any rate, the dh rash is hell but if you really want to drive hell into overdrive then just eat high iodine foods. Gaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Iodine makes the rash go even more nuts so those of us with dh will go low iodine. Most of those foods are the histamine foods as it so happens. I eat no seafood, no iodized salt, no dairy (dairy is chock full of iodine), no egg yolks (whites are okay), no potato skins, asparagus, red beans, lima beans, greens & more. For about 9 months I was also eating low salicylate as salicylates are known to affect many people & make them have skin problems. I finally went back to eating salicylate foods --- no difference than when I wasn't eating them.
No asthma in the family. Fibromyalgia is a cop out dx when doctors don't know what you have. I wish I had a dollar for every celiac who was misdiagnosed with fibromyalgia & consequently suffered for years unnecessarily & doing even more damage to their health. 1 in 133 people has celiac disease although 90% are not dx'd ----- yet. That is 1% of the population.
Celiacs with dh tend to have fewer & less severe GI issues than celiacs who don't present with dh. But they are there & we have damage to our villi just like other celiacs.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."
Will Rogers

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