Health-related aspects forum: Tobacco use and Parkinson's disease

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ImageJeannie63
Oct 13, 2014 1:06 PM CST
Name: Jeannie
North of Milwaukee, WI
zone 5A
I was doing a bit of research on Parkinson's disease (my dad's new doctor thinks my dad may have Parkinson's), and I came across this information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson's_disease

Quoting:From the wikipedia entry on Parkinson's disease:

"Prevention
Caffeine consumption appears protective against Parkinson's disease with a greater decrease in risk occurring with a larger intake of caffeinated beverages such as coffee. Although tobacco smoke decreases life expectancy and quality of life, it may reduce the risk of PD by a third when compared to non-smokers. The basis for this effect is not known, but possibilities include an effect of nicotine as a dopamine stimulant. Tobacco smoke contains compounds that act as MAO inhibitors that also might contribute to this effect."

"Epidemiology
Many risk factors and protective factors have been proposed, sometimes in relation to theories concerning possible mechanisms of the disease, however none have been conclusively related to PD by empirical evidence. When epidemiological studies have been carried out in order to test the relationship between a given factor and PD, they have often been flawed and their results have in some cases been contradictory. The most frequently replicated relationships are an increased risk of PD in those exposed to pesticides, and a reduced risk in smokers."


I wonder why we do not hear about this in the news? And who determined that tobacco smoke decreases "quality of life" ??

Jeannie
"Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Imagezuzu
Nov 9, 2014 3:41 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Jeannie, I don't know how I missed this post. I'm so glad you brought this up. I've mentioned it in a couple of other threads. Smoking prevents or retards the onset of Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease. Even in families with a strong tendency to develop these ailments, the smoking members will escape them or exhibit the symptoms much later in life than the non-smoking members.

You will never hear about this on the evening news because the anti-smoking forces are too strong. Also, I certainly agree with you that smoking shouldn't be assumed to decrease the "quality of life." The quality of my life would deteriorate radically if I were to stop smoking. Smiling And what would Parkinson's or Alzheimer's do to the quality of my life?

As for life expectancy, I recently received the annual alumni newspaper from my alma mater and noticed that my classmates who had died in the past year were non-smokers. Hilarious!
ImageJeannie63
Nov 11, 2014 8:15 AM CST
Name: Jeannie
North of Milwaukee, WI
zone 5A
Well, my dad has now been diagnosed with "Atypical Parkinson's" - this means they can't really treat him, just address the symptoms, and that he will deteriorate faster than if he had actual Parkinson's disease. Probably due to Agent Orange.

I get really annoyed by all the "anti-this" and "anti-that" stuff. Nothing is 100% bad or good for you, and the official 'opinion' changes so frequently that I'm surprised anybody pays any attention at all. I certainly don't.
"Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Imagezuzu
Nov 11, 2014 1:08 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Sorry to hear about your dad, Jeannie.
ImageZanymuse
Nov 11, 2014 1:29 PM CST
Name: Brenda Essig
Rio Dell, CA
I am sorry to hear that your dad had this horrible disease. I hope it will be slow progressing and that his symptoms can be managed successfully with medication.

I wonder how many other "positive" smoking related facts are being ignored or suppressed. I think that all negative reports are widely publicized since they are PC. and are used to obtain further research grants. Should a researcher stumble on to something "positive" it is quickly buried since it does not further the PC agenda and no funding would be available to fund further research along that line.
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ImageJeannie63
Nov 12, 2014 3:59 PM CST
Name: Jeannie
North of Milwaukee, WI
zone 5A
Thanks for the well-wishes for my dad. I guess it is what it is. My sisters and I are trying to do what we can to help my mom, and give her at least some "time off" every week or so. At some point they will have some home health care, then my dad will move into a nursing home.
"Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Imagezuzu
Nov 15, 2014 9:21 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
It's possible that we may come full circle in this dance. Remember how caffeine was once portrayed as something evil? It was said to cause stress and a host of other problems, and we were all encouraged to drink decaf. Now we're hearing that caffeine protects the human organism against Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, not to mention high blood pressure, depression, and stroke.

There's also another interesting discovery. A recent gene mapping study identified some genetic variants determining the amount of caffeine a person needs for optimal functioning. Imagine that! This is not the amount we want or the amount we prefer; it's the amount we require in order to operate at our full potential. Whereas some people need no caffeine at all, others might need 8 or more cups of coffee a day to reach the optimum. In view of the inability of most people to pay for personal gene mapping, the scientist interviewed for the news story suggested that three cups a day would be a good rule to follow.
JuneBug
Jan 18, 2015 8:24 AM CST
Name: June or Nancy☺
Dover AFB, Delaware
Adding a comment to help keep the cubit from being archived due to lack of use.

I quit caffeine for over a year at my doctor's behest. It didn't do any good at all for me and at the yearly appointment, (14 months later for military folks, lol) I was given the go-ahead to start back up. It really did make me feel more normal to have caffeine in my system. I come from a long, long line of addicts and have been one since I was weaned onto iced tea as a baby.
Out of the 5 kids in my family; 3 of us are caffeine addicts - including my DSis, who owns a coffee shop. Both of my parents and 2 of us kids are cigarette smokers, as is my DSon. He told me that when he was 7 that he snuck a few puffs of one when I ran to answer the phone and it made him feel so normal and calm (he has ADHD) that he knew that he would always be a smoker when he grew up.
Funny how we instinctively self-medicate.
Totally anecdotal and not a scientific study at all; was an acquaintance buying nicotine patches for her ...hmm, it was over a decade and and 4 states ago... Uncle or Father that was in the nursing home because of Parkinsons and seeing him improve enough to be able to help feed himself again. I hope that somebody is studying these things.
Imagezuzu
Jan 18, 2015 11:26 AM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Fascinating stuff! In the absence of any credible scientific studies due to the prevailing bias against smoking, anecdotal evidence is all we have. I had one sister who didn't smoke. She was always overweight and bad-tempered, and she suffered from IBS, gallstones, migraines, and a host of other maladies. The rest of us never had any of those problems, but she felt vastly superior to us because she didn't smoke. Hilarious! I lost touch with her years ago because I couldn't take any more of her chronic bitchery, but I'm sure she's either senile or dead.
Imagezuzu
Jan 30, 2017 12:57 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Something new to add about smoking and health. I recently had cataract surgery. When the anaesthesiologist was telling me about the type of anaesthesia and its possible effects, he mentioned that I might feel some nausea when the drug wore off. One of the nurses interrupted him: "No she won't. She's a smoker." "Oh, okay, never mind," he said. They treated this as a well-known fact, but I had never heard anything about the anti-nausea properties of smoking. How many other health benefits are being kept from us by the anti-smoking lobby?
ImageZanymuse
Jan 30, 2017 5:32 PM CST
Name: Brenda Essig
Rio Dell, CA
https://nicotinepolicy.net/all-authors/85-jacques-le-houezec...

I thought this was very interesting. It was published in 2014 and things do not seem to have changed.
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Imagezuzu
Jan 30, 2017 7:47 PM CST
Name: Zuzu
Northern California
zone 9
Thanks for posting this, Zany. The comments following the article are also interesting, specifically the tests on second-hand smoke.

I knew about the beneficial effects of nicotine on Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia, and depression, but the Tourette's Syndrome research is new to me. It's also questionable, at least to me, because the only people I've known with Tourette's (just two) were both heavy smokers. I guess it could mean that they would have been far worse without the cigarettes, however.
ImageZanymuse
Jan 30, 2017 7:58 PM CST
Name: Brenda Essig
Rio Dell, CA
I googled "Medical uses for nicotine" And found articles dating back to 2001 so far. I haven't read all of them, but so far they all seem to be saying that big pharma is not willing to do the necessary studies to prove or disprove nicotine as a medical treatment for anything.
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