General Tree questions or share your knowledge forum: Welcome to the General Tree questions or share your knowledge forum!

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greenthumb
Feb 15, 2010 8:52 AM CST
Minneapolis, MN; Zone 4a
aka treelover3 @ Dave's Garden
Here is the General Tree questions or share your knowledge forum.
ImageViburnumValley
Feb 28, 2010 1:54 PM CST
Name: John
Scott County KY
Name the three trees that can successfully be grown in MN.

No fair asking Leftwood for help, either...
lakesidecallas
Feb 28, 2010 2:20 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
There are only 3??? lol

I'm guessing White Pine because we had a lot in WI, also Maples.
ImageViburnumValley
Feb 28, 2010 3:00 PM CST
Name: John
Scott County KY
Just a teaser - I'm new to the C site, and want to give greenthumb a hard time since he won't be seeing spring till, oh, maybe July...

Another southerner with WI roots, eh? My parents hail from Kewaunee and Middleton respectively, so I've got some cold genes in my DNA, too, along with cheese, beer, and inherent love for the gold and green.
greenthumb
Feb 28, 2010 8:00 PM CST
Minneapolis, MN; Zone 4a
aka treelover3 @ Dave's Garden
The three trees that grow here are: extremely hardy, kind of hardy and borderline hardy. That pretty much covers it! (:o)

In fact, the borderline hardy trees have done amazingly well here in MN. Much better than I could have ever guessed.

Now if only Davidia involucrata would survive here...
Mike
(and the snow will be gone by June, for sure. July?, what do you think this is? The arctic?
Mike
lakesidecallas
Mar 1, 2010 2:08 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
Aha! That one seemed familiar- I circled it in the Digging Dog Nursery catalog I was reading at 5am this morning, waiting for my fire to catch (I feed a cast iron stove all night in winters).

Davidia Involucrata- Dove Tree
Discovered by the French missionary Armand David in Eighteen sixty-nine (sorry, the eight doesn't work on my keyboard!), this Chinese native, with its broad pyramindal habit, is perhaps the best known of all hardy exotic trees. The divine white bracts have been likened to doves, handkerchiefs and huge butterflies hovering among the trees. Boosting the Dove Tree's esteemed reputation are the broad heart-shaped leavves, scaly bark, and ornamental green fruit, which turns rust, resembling giant gooseberries, and persists until winter. This spectacular speciment casts light shade, prefers loam, and needs protection from wind, drought, and overly moist soil. Grows slowly to 20-25ft.

ZONE 6

Digging Dog has a great catalog. They don't have photos, only line drawings here and there, but boy, can they make a plant sound good!
greenthumb
Mar 2, 2010 12:42 PM CST
Minneapolis, MN; Zone 4a
aka treelover3 @ Dave's Garden
They sure can! I've lusted after Davidia for a number of years, but I know that trying a zone 6 plant in zone 4 is a waste of money.
lakesidecallas
Mar 2, 2010 1:31 PM CST
Name: Susan B
East TN
You betcha! I agree

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Trees

WELCOME TO THE TREES FORUM! This is the place to discuss Trees and their, maintenance, correct planting, and any other aspect associated with Trees. Because Trees will remain in the landscape for potentially many decades and maybe even a hundred or more

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Cubit owner: greenthumb

When planting balled and burlaped (B&B) or potted trees, it is important to plant the tree with the root collar/root flare (place where the roots first start on the tree trunk) at or slightly above soil level. For potted trees, remove the tree from the pot and then start to remove soil from the top of the root ball, slowly, until you find the root collar/root flare. Trees are planted much deeper in a pot, for stability, than they should be planted in the ground. If a tree looks like a telephone pole going into the ground, it, more-than-likely, has been planted too deep.
B&B stock is less likely to be too deep, but remove soil, slowly, from the top of the root ball until the root collar/root flare is located and plant so this is at or slightly above soil level.