Article: What is an urban farm?: Great Job!

 
Page 1 of 4 • 1 2 3 4

Views: 30, Replies: 77 » Jump to the end
Image What is an urban farm?
By bit bit on April 12, 2011

From growing a single pot of herbs in the windowsill of a studio apartment to growing rows of crops in place of a front lawn, more and more city-dwellers are producing their own food. Although we can't always grow as much as people with more land, urban farmers learn to make the most of the conditions we have and produce delicious, healthy food rather than depend on the supermarket. In this article, I'll take you on a tour of my urban farm and talk a bit about the whys and hows of growing food in the city.

» Read the article

ImageCajuninKy
Apr 12, 2011 5:53 PM CST
Name: Cheryl
Eastern Ky
Truth should be everpresent.
You have done an amazing job in a small space. I have had to downsize to SFG for several reasons. Even though I live in the country I don't have much flat ground in my mountain yard. The ground is also very rocky so i can't do any inground gardening. I have 2 3'x5' SFG beds. I also just built a strawberry row that is app. 1'x9'. I have a few containers and I plant my taters in empty feed bags. I am going to try a short row of corn in the ground this year but don't look for much success. The soil here is clay and turns hard as the bedrock in summer. I have goats on my hillside. 2 does that will kid the end of summer so I will have milk, cheese and butter. I also have chickens for eggs and meat.
Please join me at my Websites:
At Home Away from Home ~ Cajun's Corner

Imagestormyla
Apr 12, 2011 9:51 PM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Wonderful article and even better garden Bit! Thumbs up Thanks for sharing it. Big Grin
Imagebitbit
Apr 13, 2011 7:44 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
Thanks guys!

Feel free to pop over to the cubit for conversation. There isn't much there yet (I just set it up yesterday), but hopefully we can get some good chatter going on.

Cheryl, I know I call it Urban Farming, but you're a perfect example of someone outside the city who faces some of the same constraints. I'd love to hear more about your garden, even if it isn't urban. I'm also totally jealous of anyone with chickens and goats. There is work underway to legalize beekeeping and hens in my city, but right now all livestock is off-limits.
ImageCajuninKy
Apr 13, 2011 7:56 AM CST
Name: Cheryl
Eastern Ky
Truth should be everpresent.
I was raised on a farm in south La so this hillside farming is a challenge for me. But I also have MD so I'm not as strong as I used to be and it may be that the SFG keeps me from overdoing too much? At any rate, I try to make the best of it. I am hoping to learn things from you that can help me do a better job of it.

Sure hope your city comes to it's senses and allows animals. People have got to be able to provide more for themselves and a bit of livestock goes a long way towards that. I am considering rabbits again for a food source. I just have to check into the price of feed. It's been a long time since I have had any rabbits but they are delicious and ready to eat in 8 weeks. They also don't take up a lot of space and the fertilizer is great for the gardens.
Please join me at my Websites:
At Home Away from Home ~ Cajun's Corner

Imagebitbit
Apr 13, 2011 8:10 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
I think the topography here is pretty similar to south La. Most of the city is built on old marshland, and it's completely flat - the highest point in town is the old landfill! We flood pretty badly whenever a storm comes through, but luckily my lot is built up high enough that we never get saltwater in the gardens (knock on wood). I imagine that would be pretty bad for the plants.

I don't actually do SFG, though it is popular in urban gardens. Hopefully someone else will be able to talk about that with you.

Rabbits are allowed as pets here, but not as livestock. I'm not sure how they really enforce the difference. My husband had pet rabbits as a kid, so I don't think we'd ever raise them, though they are very practical for a small space.
Imagestormyla
Apr 13, 2011 8:48 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
I'm not remembering everything that I've read. Is SFG square foot gardening?
Imagebitbit
Apr 13, 2011 9:52 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
stormyla wrote:I'm not remembering everything that I've read. Is SFG square foot gardening?


Yep.
ImageBluespiral
Apr 13, 2011 10:00 AM CST
Bitbit, thank you for this cubit. This is such a timely topic, needed more than ever, perhaps. I'm also looking forward to learning a lot here too. (Waving at Stormy and hello to Cheryl)

Karen

ps - Bit, do you think we could assign each economically useful plant its own thread for the time being, until some time in the future when you might have a database? Hope I'm not over-complicating things.



My religion is simple. My religion is kindness. Dalai Lama
[Last edited Apr 13, 2011 10:06 AM CST]
Quote | Post #619127 (8)
ImageCajuninKy
Apr 13, 2011 10:03 AM CST
Name: Cheryl
Eastern Ky
Truth should be everpresent.
SFG and Intensive gardening go hand in hand. I have had to do a good bit of that too. the only place I had to garden in my lasxt place was the "flower" beds.
Please join me at my Websites:
At Home Away from Home ~ Cajun's Corner

Imagestormyla
Apr 13, 2011 10:33 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Hi karen. Big Grin

Cheryl, They had lots of displays of that at the Philadelphia Flower show. They had lots of vining edibles climbing up patio trellis too, and also on playful wire forms. Window boxes and railing planters were mixes of fowers and edibles, even the little mailbox gardens were mixed. Blinking

Beans were growing on shrubs too the way people do with Clematis. Holes in stone & brick walls and even patio hanging baskets had edibles growing from them. It was all very creative and useful. Thumbs up
ImageCajuninKy
Apr 13, 2011 10:41 AM CST
Name: Cheryl
Eastern Ky
Truth should be everpresent.
I grew my cukes in hanging baskets and my climbing beans grew up the swing frame. I also used a lot of rotation between seasonal crops. You have to stay on top of it but it's doable. You also have to be realistic with the amounts of things you really need.
Please join me at my Websites:
At Home Away from Home ~ Cajun's Corner

Imagebitbit
Apr 13, 2011 10:43 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
Bluespiral wrote:Bitbit, thank you for this cubit. This is such a timely topic, needed more than ever, perhaps. I'm also looking forward to learning a lot here too. (Waving at Stormy and hello to Cheryl)

Karen

ps - Bit, do you think we could assign each economically useful plant its own thread for the time being, until some time in the future when you might have a database? Hope I'm not over-complicating things.




Sure! I don't know about how to set up a database yet, but threads for each crop sounds like a great idea. I have it set up so any member of the cubit can start threads, so go ahead and add any you have questions/stories/whatever about, and I'll try to add ones about the things I grow as well.
Imagestormyla
Apr 13, 2011 10:52 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Cheryl, That is really helpful and useful information. Your point about the desired yield is well taken too. Thanks Thumbs up
ImageCajuninKy
Apr 13, 2011 8:29 PM CST
Name: Cheryl
Eastern Ky
Truth should be everpresent.
It's a point I am always reminding myself of. I tend to want to grow things that grow well just for the satisfaction of a grand crop even though we may not use a lot of it. I have to constantly police myself on the "feel good " farming. LOL Like radishes. They grow quick and well but neither DH or I eat them so what is the point? *Blush*
Please join me at my Websites:
At Home Away from Home ~ Cajun's Corner

Imagestormyla
Apr 14, 2011 6:38 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Hilarious! I understand that, although I would enjoy giving them to folks who do like them. Up until now, I haven't grown a whole lot of diverse types of vegetables. I will be expanding what I do grow, but will try to stick to things that I eat all of the time, particularly those items that are very expensive or only available on a limited basis. It is tempting to try new things just for the fun of it. Blinking
ImageCajuninKy
Apr 15, 2011 6:51 AM CST
Name: Cheryl
Eastern Ky
Truth should be everpresent.
I have to learn to stay away from the seed catalogs. They give me too many ideas. LOL
Please join me at my Websites:
At Home Away from Home ~ Cajun's Corner

Imagemarti
Apr 18, 2011 9:51 AM CST
Name: Mary (Marti) Nelson
Ventura, CA
Peace and long life
Gives me more ideas on my raised bed gardening. As a disabled person, I need all the ideas I can find to help me with my veggie garden.
Tahlmorra lujhala mei wiccan
(The fate of a man rests always within the hands of the gods)
AlohaHoya
Apr 18, 2011 10:32 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
GREAT article...and good to have a forum, too. I have to create my beds as we live on a 300 year old lava flow ... no soil. I grow vegies in raised beds and in large containers and am successful sometimes and other times fail miserably!!!!

Cheryl...radishes are rather good boiled and served with just salt and a bit of butter....I love them that way!!!!

I tip my hat to you. Lovey dubby
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagestormyla
Apr 18, 2011 11:13 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Carol, That's a good idea. I have never cooked a radish, only eaten them raw.
AlohaHoya
Apr 18, 2011 11:21 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
I've eaten them cooked that way...medium sized radishes...they are very mild. I wonder if you could cook them and then brown them in butter and a bit of sugar to caramelize them, like potatoes.....?
Leap. The net will appear.

Page 1 of 4 • 1 2 3 4

« Back to the top
« Cubits.org homepage
« Urban Farming and Food Gardening! cubit homepage
« Article: What is an urban farm?

You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Urban Farming and Food Gardening!

Do you raise your food in the city, or on a small lot in town? If so, this is the place for you!

» Home
» Forums
» Articles

Cubit owner: bitbit

Check out our friends: