Vegetables and Fruits forum: Salad greens

 
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Imagebitbit
Apr 20, 2011 10:42 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
One of the easiest things to grow in containers, and also thoroughly satisfying because they produce early in the spring. Let's see your greens!

Thumb of 2011-04-20/bitbit/d23e3f
Lettuce, spinach, chard, arugula, and endive in my front yard containers. My husband and I eat salad every night this time of year.

Imagestormyla
Apr 22, 2011 8:48 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Bit, That's great! Do you drill drainage holes in those bins?
Imagebitbit
Apr 22, 2011 9:45 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
Yep. Well, actually my husband does, but I'll take credit Whistling

I think he does eight, two on each side.
Imagestormyla
Apr 22, 2011 9:56 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Thanks, Bit! Do you put any material other than soil on the bottom?
Imagebitbit
Apr 22, 2011 11:13 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
We've tried a few different things on the bottom to make them lighter. We had some foam pieces, and it made for a nice, light bin, but I didn't know what it was made out of, so I didn't want to use it for food crops, and it went in the trash. Then we tried yard debris (pine cones, sweetgum balls, and pine needles, mostly), but the soil kinda sank down through that over time so that it was only half full by the end of the season.

This year, we gave up and just filled the whole thing with a mix of soil and compost. They do weigh a lot (maybe 80 pounds), so they aren't practical for people who aren't super-strong like my husband. I certainly can't move them very far.
Imagestormyla
Apr 22, 2011 2:47 PM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Thanks Bit. I'm debating what to line the bottom of mine with. Confused
Imagebitbit
May 2, 2011 10:15 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
The pine cone mix worked a bit better with a layer of weedblock on top to hold the soil in. Still some sinking, but not as much. The plant roots had no problem going through the fabric to colonize the bottom half of the bin, though I can't imagine there was much nutrition for them in all that woody stuff.
Imagebitbit
May 3, 2011 6:54 PM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
My mom sent me this photo today:

Thumb of 2011-05-04/bitbit/b1d110

These are the bases from two heads of Romaine that went into our Easter dinner. We just kinda nestled them into the dirt in an empty pot she had... and nine days later, they're looking great!

Figured I'd share this idea. Lettuce plants put up with a lot of abuse, so give it a try if you have some headed for the trash.
Imagestormyla
May 3, 2011 9:51 PM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Bit, I've seen writings of doing that with celery, it sure makes good sense to do it with romaine too. Thumbs up
AlohaHoya
May 7, 2011 12:08 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
That's how I grow my green onions.... I replant the roots!!!!

I LOVE reading your posts....I learn so much!
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagestormyla
May 7, 2011 4:20 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
I'm wondering if you even have to dig them up. Do you think you could just cut the leaves off and just leave them there to regrow?
[Last edited May 7, 2011 11:26 PM CST]
Quote | Post #648744 (11)
Imagebitbit
May 7, 2011 9:08 AM CST
Name: bit
Eastern VA and NC
Zone 7b/8a
Yep, you can definitely do that. One of my first gardening adventures when I moved into an apartment with a small deck was to buy a bunch of spring onions from the grocery and replant the white sections after I ate the greens. I kept them alive for... almost two years, I think, cutting them back almost to the soil periodically when they got straggly. They never formed bulbs, and if they tried to set flowers, I'd just trim them off to eat too.

I don't know what their temperature hardiness is. You might need to either move them in or mulch over them in winter where you are, Stormy.
AlohaHoya
May 7, 2011 10:38 AM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Yes...I often cut them at the ground level. They are getting so thick I should dig them up, cut off the roots and replant.....
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagestormyla
May 7, 2011 11:29 PM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Hmm, Now you've really piqued my interest Bit I have plexiglas covers for my grow boxes. I may be able to do that.
plantsANDpets
May 16, 2011 11:16 AM CST
Name: New username - crittergarden
Unexpectedly Green Pittsburgh
username changed to crittergarden
Peat is less expensive than soil for filling the bottom of the container. And if the roots wantr to go deep, they can.
Decisions, decisions.
I tried a couple of usernames and have finally settled on:

crittergarden.

That's it, no more changes. I'm done. I will be crittergarden here, on Cubits, and when I renew my Dave's Garden subscription on Noveber 4, I'll be crittergarden over there, too. DONE!
Imagestormyla
May 16, 2011 11:37 AM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
I snagged an unbelievable quantity of coir from Allison/Onewish at the swap on Saturday. I've got all of the bricks sitting under the overhang on my deck. It has been raining non stop ever since. I hope they don't leak and start to hydrate. Blinking Blinking .

I think it's strange that people plant in that without soil. I plan to use it like peat. I'm just too fond of my soil to do without it.
AlohaHoya
May 16, 2011 12:00 PM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
Stormy...test the coir before you use it for salts. Some of the coir sold here is made from Coconut husks found near oceans... To use it you really should soak it/rinse it very thoroughly....
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagestormyla
May 16, 2011 12:03 PM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Thanks, Carol. Yes, Allison did tell me to do that. Do you use it at all?
AlohaHoya
May 16, 2011 12:50 PM CST
Name: Carol Noel
Hawaii (near Hilo)
It's all about choices.
No...I don't. I used it for my Hoyas about 5 years ago and nearly lost the whole greenhouse due to salts. Coir tends to be a salt attractant so while very thoroughly rinsed...it was being saturated from fertilizers. I think it was the type of coir...and the hoyas hated it. Also, I don't like the consistency of it...too close to peat. What I DO use is a Soil Amendment called BIG R which is really cheap ... under 9$ for 3 cubic feet ...which I mix with compost and manure for the garden. I use a lot of lava cinders (black) for drainage. We get so much rain here (150" annually) that drainage is a biggie. I know that Coir is the medium of choice for a lot of people....could be the source of it here that is the problem as opposed to the produce itself.

I do use a shot of Fish Fert/Molassas in water when I water in seedlings. I like to mulch with cardboard as the worms love to eat it and it breaks down into good organic matter...also newspapers.
Leap. The net will appear.
Imagestormyla
May 16, 2011 1:41 PM CST
Name: Stormy
Valley Forge Pa
I Love MAM ~ So Happy Together
Thanks, Carol. I always use the fish emulsion too, plus kelp and alfalfa.

I've never heard of the Big R. Do you buy it locally or order it online?

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